[blindkid] Technology and Little Kid

Heather craney07 at rochester.rr.com
Thu Feb 18 23:30:45 UTC 2010


Just fyi, the ipod touch talks and is accessible.  My friend Amanda who goes 
to NYC has one and loves it.  She also has and loves her mac book, because 
they have a built in, awsum screnereader that is free, unlike JFW, which the 
mere mention of makes my wallet squeek in fear and run away from home.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Richard Holloway" <rholloway at gopbc.org>
To: "NFBnet Blind Kid Mailing List,(for parents of blind children)" 
<blindkid at nfbnet.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2010 10:00 AM
Subject: Re: [blindkid] Technology and Little Kid


>I just re-read Dave's question.
>
> I think some of us (myself included) may have missed part of his  original 
> question. The child's peers, assuming they have typical  vision, are most 
> likely seeing technology constantly. It will take a  lot more than only a 
> slate and stylus to "keep up". I guess it sort of  begs the question as to 
> what in particular she wants to keep up with  the most, but obviously 
> there will need to be braille and presumably a  cane introduced if they 
> are not already in use. (I assume the child is  able to travel typically.) 
> My point being not to overlook the obvious--
>
> If the kids are playing stories or music, it might be a library of 
> congress tape player or their newer digital system, or it might be an  mp3 
> player, and that could be a typical player with tactile buttons  (as in 
> the exact opposite of an ipod touch) or something more extreme,  like a 
> victor reader.
>
> If the kids are enjoying videos, it might be playing described videos  or 
> even conventional ones in a way the child can manage on his/her  own. The 
> technology in this case might be the adapted media itself or  simply an 
> accessible player-- maybe it is marking controls with  tactile tape and 
> avoiding flat, smooth controls. If other kids are on  the computer, it 
> might be using a screen reader like Jaws, and on and  on.
>
> I would again suggest something like her looking at the list I posted  to 
> get a better idea of what she's really trying to accomplish:
> http://www.gopbc.org/gopbc_technology.htm
>
> There are doubtless more comprehensive lists with even more ideas  (please 
> post them if you have them), but the answer to keep up with  peers across 
> the board in technology is going to involve long-term  exposure to many 
> different adaptations and technology solutions  because that is what all 
> the other kids have around themselves  constantly...
>
> Richard
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 17, 2010, at 10:01 PM, David Andrews wrote:
>
>> I got asked a question, the other day, and since most of my  experience 
>> is with blind adults -- I didn't know quite what to say.   A woman said 
>> she had a four year old totally blind daughter, and she  wanted her to 
>> keep up with her peers in technology, so what  assistive 
>> technology/technology is there  -- should she start using  with her 
>> child?
>>
>> Dave
>>
>>
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