[blindkid] running, treadmills, etc

Richard Holloway rholloway at gopbc.org
Tue Jun 15 02:40:04 UTC 2010


I tend to agree that outside is better in theory, but I also see that  
Kendra is more inclined to run on a treadmill, for now. If that is all  
she'll do, it is better than nothing, but I suspect it is more likely  
a progressive thing for her. Build some confidence on a predictable  
surface and then we can probably move on, (maybe try the rope trick  
next) though quite honestly, I'd just as soon wait to move on until  
the temp drops below the upper 90's around here. There is much to me  
said for treadmills, trampolines and the like, combined with air  
conditioning in the summertime!

Richard


On Jun 14, 2010, at 9:42 PM, Debby B wrote:

> Agreed, outside is so much better! But now that Winona has to run  
> the mile every few days for her online PE course, that heat and  
> humidity is making us think twice.
>
> Debby
> bwbddl at yahoo.com
>
>
> http://www.raceforindependence.org/goto/winona.brackett ($35 to go!)
> Daniel's mission trip: www.reignministries.org/sponsor-rs
> or Reign Ministries, 5401 W. Broadway Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55428
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Carol Castellano <blindchildren at verizon.net>
> To: "NFBnet Blind Kid Mailing List, (for parents of blind children)"  
> <blindkid at nfbnet.org>
> Sent: Mon, June 14, 2010 7:08:50 PM
> Subject: Re: [blindkid] running, treadmills, etc
>
> I'm with you, Jan.  Outside or bust!
> CArol
>
> At 04:33 PM 6/14/2010, you wrote:
>
>> Even a treadmill is not like running outside.
>> I, as an adult, realize that I always need to keep one hand on the  
>> treadmill bar.
>> I notice that my sighted peers can walk/run hands free and read a  
>> book (turning pages as needed.) I can't and fell off trying.
>> (smile)
>> The feel, the bounce, the texture underfoot is just different. For  
>> me, it is a bit less secure. I have gotten use to it, but still, it  
>> is not the same as the ground outside.
>>
>> As far as running, I know that USABA (United States Association for  
>> Blind Athletes)  does it by tethering  a guide to the blind person  
>> (usually around the arm of the guide and the arm of the blind  
>> person). . The blind person feels a slight tug or push on the arm  
>> when they are veering the wrong way.
>> They will eventually perseptively feel the slack of the tether and  
>> adjust.
>> Most blind people that I know don't walk or run straight. Yes, I  
>> know about "imagine that you are on a tight rope." I have even  
>> walked on a balance beam, yet, I still don't walk straight without  
>> trailing landmarks.
>> If you are going to do the "hand on the rope with a ball of tape on  
>> the end to indicate the stopping point,"  you need to remember that  
>> every child has his own reflex time. You will have to adjust that  
>> time. Sometimes, it is good to put two pieces of material or  
>> stopping  identifiers and let the child practice. Also, if it is  
>> just a straight line where the child will have to run back and  
>> forth, they are not really relaxed because they are always looking  
>> for the stop and having to pivot quickly. I do recommend a circular  
>> kind of track verses a straight line (there and back), but those  
>> tracks have their own problems.
>>
>> You know, usually sighted people can't stop on a dime. If blind  
>> people run full throttle, they can't either.
>> So, if you put a thin piece of material as the warning and a  
>> thicker piece when they are suppose to stop (remembering  to leave  
>> some lag space for the slowing down process, it can work).
>> I've tried those indoor tracks. I don't know how people can run on  
>> them. A swift walk is all that I can muster.
>> And, personally, although I will use a treadmill, I find  
>> them ... ... kind of artificial. My preference certainly is to get  
>> outside and run. But, maybe that is me and only minimally is a  
>> result of  my blindness.
>>
>> Jan
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>
> Carol Castellano, President
> National Organization of Parents of Blind Children
> 973-377-0976
> carol_castellano at verizon.net
> www.nopbc.org
>
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