[Blindmath] Accessible Calculators Simplify Radicals?

kperry at blinksoft.com kperry at blinksoft.com
Sat Feb 14 16:46:16 UTC 2015


Your math teacher was incorrect when he told you the Orion TI-84 could not
do simplification of radicals.  Note that the Ti-84 is a powerful
programmable calculator.  If you do a search online for simplifying radicals
there are many tube videos  that show how to write the program to do it.  If
you do not want to write the small program you can also download it in many
places.  I downloaded one a few minutes ago and was going to test to make
sure it worked with the speech output some will not.  I forgot my data link
cable at work though so I can't test it.  I might sit down and type in the
program tonight but I don't have time at the moment.  

So true the Ti-84 doesn't do it by default but it is not a hard thing to add
to the calculator.   



-----Original Message-----
From: Blindmath [mailto:blindmath-bounces at nfbnet.org] On Behalf Of Mary
Woodyard via Blindmath
Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2015 8:44 AM
To: blindmath at nfbnet.org
Subject: [Blindmath] Accessible Calculators Simplify Radicals?

All great questions Joe!  My son is a senior in high school and I have
struggled with many of these same calculator questions.  The Orion 36X that
was suggested earlier does not do simplify radicals.  My son's Dir Of
Special Ed was a Math teacher who looked at all available Scientific
Calculators and none of them would help you with that.

The developer of the graphing Accessible TI 84 told me that he was planning
on bringing an accessible TI 30SX that would handle square roots and would
be most helpful to you when it is released.  If anyone working on that
project is reading this - maybe they can give us a time frame.  My son does
have some residual vision in one eye so he uses the 30sx most of the time
instead of the Accessible Scientific Calculator (The Orion 36X) that I
bought for him because the key strokes are the same as the rest of the class
is using.

The accessible 84 graphing calculator uses the same key strokes as the rest
of the class (which again teachers love because they do not have to slow
down and learn how to do something on just your calculator), however the
last time it checked it would not simplify radicals - which is what I think
you want with the square roots.  This ability to simplify radicals may have
been added to the functionality of the 84 accessible calculator now as it is
upgradable.  Does anyone reading this know?  When you are looking for a
calculator make sure you know if the class requires a scientific accessible
calculator (which for you would be the Orion TI 36X) or a graphing one as
they are different.  

My son prefers to have his tests given in a testing center so that he can
use extended time easily and also so a human reader can be available to
answer any questions that might need to be clarified on the tests.  He might
change his mind of an English or Social Studies test though - and take it in
class.  IT just depends on the visual complexity  of the test. 

So if you are looking for the ability to simplify radicals for the square
roots, does anyone know if the latest version of the Scientific Accessible
TI 36X or the Graphing Accessible TI 84 will simplify radicals.  One nice
thing about the TI 84 is it will communicate with an embosser via a file
transfer which you need an additional cable for.  That is another thing to
check out!

Good Luck!




-----Original Message-----
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Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2015 7:00 AM
To: blindmath at nfbnet.org
Subject: Blindmath Digest, Vol 103, Issue 11

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Today's Topics:

   1. Accessible education (joe walker)
   2. accessible talking calculators (kroskos at cox.net)
   3. Re: accessible talking calculators (Brian Richwine)
   4. Re: accessible talking calculators (Larry Skutchan)
   5. Re: Accessible education (Sabra Ewing)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 12:38:27 -0700
From: joe walker <joewalker0082 at gmail.com>
To: Blind Math list for those interested in mathematics
	<blindmath at nfbnet.org>
Subject: [Blindmath] Accessible education
Message-ID:
	<CAFF1d_p=_gknEwcP=LbvGZG-X7dCKYQ_=mOoOrXLys1UnsWqvA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Hello, my name is Joe Walker, and once again, I am a blind individual who is
actively seeking out new and effective forms of accessibility.
I would like to obtain a general picture of how blind students and
professionals adapt a variety of situations. I specificly want to know how
blind students have navigated a variety of challenges in the college
setting. I have received vocational and skills training, as well as studied
many discussions on this forum, but still have not been able to overcome all
the necessary obstacles in order to attend college. Regarding the issues of
math and science, as well as the issue of visual representations in general,
I want to know how you navigated the following:

1. electronic learning platforms, (i.e), online whiteboard, interactive and
graphical learning sites, multimedia and flash content, etc

2. Taking tests at testing centers and using testing software,

3. obtaining alternative materials when braille is not available or most
feasible, like when taking computer classes, advanced math and science
courses, etc Given that many of these issues are most prevalent when
referring to Math and Science courses, I feel it appropriate to ask this on
the math forum, although I do feel like these issues still span the globe of
education. I greatly appreciate any and all feedback on this question. You
can also reach me directly at my email:
joewalker0082 at gmail.com

I thank you for your participation in this mailing list, and I look forward
to hearing from you soon.



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 14:50:56 -0500
From: <kroskos at cox.net>
To: <blindmath at nfbnet.org>
Subject: [Blindmath] accessible talking calculators
Message-ID: <5C09E7E24EDB4463A87ACCD6660DB1D4 at AsusDesktop>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello, 

I am trying to navigate the first of two required math classes in an online
setting. I find that my simple talking calculator is not sufficient for
certain functions such as square roots, exponents and logs. Is there such a
thing as a talking calculator with advanced features, and if so, where can I
find one, and how much might it cost. I am realizing that in the class I
need to take next, there may be many advanced calculations required. 

Thanks for any input. 

Kathy    

------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 15:07:47 -0500
From: Brian Richwine <blrichwine at gmail.com>
To: kroskos at cox.net, Blind Math list for those interested in
	mathematics	<blindmath at nfbnet.org>
Subject: Re: [Blindmath] accessible talking calculators
Message-ID:
	<CAMfmcGrAxJsEWJb=QsCtKE11A2H=pafrVE4+hcwQpaeNCtUZtQ at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

We've provided a talking version of the TI-36X calculator to students in the
past. It is a modified version of the calculator that a 3rd party makes. The
company that provides them is called Orion. Here is a link to the product
info: http://www.orbitresearch.com/orion_details.php

The students were able to take statistics courses. It has scientific
functions and basic statistics features built into it.

-Brian

On Fri, Feb 13, 2015 at 2:50 PM, Kathy via Blindmath <blindmath at nfbnet.org>
wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I am trying to navigate the first of two required math classes in an 
> online setting. I find that my simple talking calculator is not 
> sufficient for certain functions such as square roots, exponents and 
> logs. Is there such a thing as a talking calculator with advanced 
> features, and if so, where can I find one, and how much might it cost.
> I am realizing that in the class I need to take next, there may be 
> many advanced calculations required.
>
> Thanks for any input.
>
> Kathy
> _______________________________________________
> Blindmath mailing list
> Blindmath at nfbnet.org
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/blindmath_nfbnet.org
> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for
> Blindmath:
>
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/options/blindmath_nfbnet.org/blrichwine%40gm
> ail.com
> BlindMath Gems can be found at <
> http://www.blindscience.org/blindmath-gems-home>
>


------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 20:19:32 +0000
From: Larry Skutchan <lskutchan at aph.org>
To: "kroskos at cox.net" <kroskos at cox.net>, "Blind Math list for those
	interested in mathematics" <blindmath at nfbnet.org>
Subject: Re: [Blindmath] accessible talking calculators
Message-ID:
	<F1A0A7D69F629E4988C176C8D51003833F769EBA at WINSRVEX10.aph.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The most advanced talking calculator available is the TI-84 Talking Graphing
Calculator from APH.
See
http://tech.aph.org/gc_info.htm


-----Original Message-----
From: Blindmath [mailto:blindmath-bounces at nfbnet.org] On Behalf Of Kathy via
Blindmath
Sent: Friday, February 13, 2015 2:51 PM
To: blindmath at nfbnet.org
Subject: [Blindmath] accessible talking calculators

Hello, 

I am trying to navigate the first of two required math classes in an online
setting. I find that my simple talking calculator is not sufficient for
certain functions such as square roots, exponents and logs. Is there such a
thing as a talking calculator with advanced features, and if so, where can I
find one, and how much might it cost. I am realizing that in the class I
need to take next, there may be many advanced calculations required. 

Thanks for any input. 

Kathy    
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To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for
Blindmath:
http://nfbnet.org/mailman/options/blindmath_nfbnet.org/lskutchan%40aph.org
BlindMath Gems can be found at
<http://www.blindscience.org/blindmath-gems-home>



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 15:57:35 -0600
From: Sabra Ewing <sabra1023 at gmail.com>
To: joe walker <joewalker0082 at gmail.com>,	Blind Math list for those
	interested in mathematics <blindmath at nfbnet.org>
Subject: Re: [Blindmath] Accessible education
Message-ID: <7476C2A5-F7F9-4D92-B4CB-209C92428D82 at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset=us-ascii

Firstly, you will have to register with the office for students with
disabilities at your college. Even if you don't want to, it is basically
impossible to get through college without the accommodations you can get by
being registered with this office. These accommodations will include binding
accessible alternatives or finding another way to access the content if it
is flash for example and you can't read it with the screen reader. It also
includes alternative testing situations. A lot of students test directly in
the office for students with disabilities, but for a lot of my classes, I
prefer to test in the classroom when possible in case I can't understand the
directions of the exam, because testing in the office for students with
disabilities requires access planning and scheduling, and because if there
are any problems with me reading or taking the test, the teacher is right
there to troubleshoot them. However, in some cases, this isn't possible. For
example, if I am taking a history test, I will take that electronically
using a computer. Because I am taking this test in a different format from
the rest of the students, the professor will probably prefer me to take it
in the office for students with disabilities. However, in the programming
for example, in programming, I can take the test on the computer like the
other students do, so I can just take it in the classroom.

Sabra Ewing

> On Feb 13, 2015, at 1:38 PM, joe walker via Blindmath
<blindmath at nfbnet.org> wrote:
> 
> Hello, my name is Joe Walker, and once again, I am a blind individual 
> who is actively seeking out new and effective forms of accessibility.
> I would like to obtain a general picture of how blind students and 
> professionals adapt a variety of situations. I specificly want to know 
> how blind students have navigated a variety of challenges in the 
> college setting. I have received vocational and skills training, as 
> well as studied many discussions on this forum, but still have not 
> been able to overcome all the necessary obstacles in order to attend 
> college. Regarding the issues of math and science, as well as the 
> issue of visual representations in general, I want to know how you 
> navigated the following:
> 
> 1. electronic learning platforms, (i.e), online whiteboard, 
> interactive and graphical learning sites, multimedia and flash 
> content, etc
> 
> 2. Taking tests at testing centers and using testing software,
> 
> 3. obtaining alternative materials when braille is not available or 
> most feasible, like when taking computer classes, advanced math and 
> science courses, etc Given that many of these issues are most 
> prevalent when referring to Math and Science courses, I feel it 
> appropriate to ask this on the math forum, although I do feel like 
> these issues still span the globe of education. I greatly appreciate 
> any and all feedback on this question. You can also reach me directly 
> at my email:
> joewalker0082 at gmail.com
> 
> I thank you for your participation in this mailing list, and I look 
> forward to hearing from you soon.
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Blindmath mailing list
> Blindmath at nfbnet.org
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/blindmath_nfbnet.org
> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for
Blindmath:
>
http://nfbnet.org/mailman/options/blindmath_nfbnet.org/sabra1023%40gmail.com
> BlindMath Gems can be found at
<http://www.blindscience.org/blindmath-gems-home>



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------------------------------

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