[Blindmath] Explaining Rotations to a Scribe?

Sabra Ewing sabra1023 at gmail.com
Tue Sep 27 23:11:13 UTC 2016


What Jonathan said is exactly why I have a problem with using them. I often get professors who have never worked with a blind student, and the people who deal with excess ability usually don't know a lot about math. Maybe they Hood have you write the new function. For example, if you have the function y = 2x, What would the new function be if it was rotated about the line y = x. For all of those scenarios, including when the function is stretching and shrinking, you can write with the new function would be. I get more out of reading what the old function is versus with the new function is than feeling a picture or trying to describe one.

Sabra Ewing

> On Sep 27, 2016, at 2:23 PM, Godfrey, Jonathan via Blindmath <blindmath at nfbnet.org> wrote:
> 
> Hello,
> 
> I understood your description perfectly well. The problem is not one of communication, but one of who you are communicating with.
> 
> I feel that while you need to ask this question you put yourself at risk of having your ability measured against your ability to convey a message to a person who is less than suitably qualified to understand it. The rest of the class need only explain themselves to a higher authority (the marker, not quite a god) while a blind person often needs to explain themselves to a third party. This is actually not a fair expectation of a student and the person administering the education or assessment ought to know what they are loading on their students.
> 
> I was fortunate to work with enlightened staff who realised that if they wanted to know what I was capable of, they needed to make sure it was my work and understanding they were seeing. That meant using postgrad students in mathematics or the appropriate discipline to act as scribes (we call them reader/writers here) in almost every test or exam. I was also lucky to get the right access to willing postgrad students and under-employed staff to help tutor me as and when required.
> 
> As a consequence, my lecturers, many of which are now colleagues, know what I was able to do for myself and what was a limitation of my blindness.
> 
> Good luck finding the right person.
> Jonathan
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Blindmath [mailto:blindmath-bounces at nfbnet.org] On Behalf Of Hunter Jozwiak via Blindmath
> Sent: Wednesday, 28 September 2016 7:25 a.m.
> To: blindmath at nfbnet.org
> Cc: Hunter Jozwiak
> Subject: [Blindmath] Explaining Rotations to a Scribe?
> 
> Hi,
> 
> 
> 
> What is the best way to explain rotations for solids of revolution about an axis or line? As an example, how do I explain rotating the function y = e^2x and the line y = e^2 about the x axis? I have a feeling that we talked about this in Precalc, but if so, I have unfortunately since forgotten.
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks for your input,
> 
> 
> 
> Hunter
> 
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