[Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.

Robert Sollars robertsollars2 at gmail.com
Mon Aug 27 18:54:34 UTC 2018


No Rob it doesn'tmake you less intelligent. But when you are hiring for a
postion of trust and authority you need tolook at the individual and how
they are dressed. I don'tmind t-shirts and jeans but had to be sevicable. As
for the body art and haridos...those could hamper the performance of their
job as a security officer so therefore they were dismissed...unless there
was a very storng reason not to.
I hired and/or interview hundreds of people. Some had disabilities of one
kind or another,not blind ordeaf, couldn't afford proper clothes, or had
just invested $200 in a new nose ring or hairdo. Those people were unlikely
to change the ring or doo so.
I hired a man in a wheelchair. I hired a man with one arm shorter than the
other. I also hired one of my best officers who had a stuttering problem.
You have to look at the total picture as well as their clothes. As the old
adage sayd "Clothes make the man, or woman in these cases".
If they don't care about their appearance for a jobn  working with public in
which trust and respect which is a a naturalassumption, then they probably
won't do a good job when they get on-site.
Robert 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jobs <jobs-bounces at nfbnet.org> On Behalf Of Rob via Jobs
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 10:50 AM
To: Jobs for the Blind <jobs at nfbnet.org>
Cc: Rob <captinlogic at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.

Isn't rejecting a person based on how they are dressed as bad as rejecting
them because they are black, or because they are blind. Who cares if your
socks don't match. Or another example. I know people who stutter, but does
that make them any less smart? I don't think so.  I can't hear very well, so
I don't talk very often. Does that make me less capable?

----- Original Message -----
From: Robert Sollars via Jobs <jobs at nfbnet.org>
To: "'Jobs for the Blind'" <jobs at nfbnet.org>
Cc: Robert Sollars <robertsollars2 at gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2018 10:43:41 -0700
Subject: Re: [Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.

> I have to respectfully disagree Dick.
> 
> Depending on the job, it may not be important but on the other handif
they are interviewing for an office position or management position then
their dress in the interview says a lot about how they handle themselves and
how they will handle the job.
> 
> In my previous life I rejected several people applying for a security job
simply for the way they were dressed. T-shirts, torn jeans and a multitude
of ear rings not to mention outlandish hair-sos were a fefinate rejection
in my book.
> 
> Again, it depends on the job Jordy is interviewing for but coming to an
interview appropriately dressed is an absolute must in my book.
> 
> Robert
> 
>  
> 
> From: Jobs <jobs-bounces at nfbnet.org> On Behalf Of Andrews, David B 
> (DEED) via Jobs
> Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 9:45 AM
> To: Jobs for the Blind <jobs at nfbnet.org>
> Cc: Andrews, David B (DEED) <david.b.andrews at state.mn.us>
> Subject: Re: [Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.
> 
>  
> 
> It seems to me that any question you might ask wouldnt necessarily have
any bearing on how they were currently dressed. 
> 
>  
> 
> All our interviews are done by at least three people, so there is always a
sighted person I can ask, or I could also ask the receptionist after words. 
> 
>  
> 
> Dave
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> David Andrews | Chief Technology Officer Minnesota Department of 
> Employment and Economic Development State Services for the Blind
> 2200 University Ave West, Suite 240, St. Paul MN 55114
> Direct: 651-539-2294
>  <http://mn.gov/deed> Web |  <http://twitter.com/mndeed> Twitter |  
> <http://facebook.com/mndeed> Facebook
> 
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> From: Jobs [mailto:jobs-bounces at nfbnet.org] On Behalf Of Jordy 
> Stringer via Jobs
> Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 11:40 AM
> To: Jobs for the Blind <jobs at nfbnet.org>
> Cc: Jordy Stringer <jordystringer83 at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.
> 
>  
> 
> The dress code is discussed in the company manual, but individuals
typically dont have access to that until they have been offered and
excepted a position.
>  
> 
> Tomorrow is just the first round and I hadnt planned on getting into
anything regarding specific policies at the earliest until interview number
two.
>  Perhaps this has been an oversight, again this is my maiden voyage. Some
years ago I was a licensed vendor through the Randolph Sheppard program and
had employees but dress was less of a concern, so I never thought about it
in terms of interview questions.    
> 
>  
> 
> Jordy D. Stringer
> 
> believe you can and youre halfway there. 
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
> On Aug 27, 2018, at 12:28 PM, Steven Atkinson via Jobs <jobs at nfbnet.org
<mailto:jobs at nfbnet.org> > wrote:
> 
> Jordy,
> 
>  
> 
> Would it not work well to just confirm with the new hire what the company
dress code is?
> 
>  
> 
> From: Jobs [mailto:jobs-bounces at nfbnet.org] On Behalf Of Jordy 
> Stringer via Jobs
> Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 12:22 PM
> To: jobs at nfbnet.org <mailto:jobs at nfbnet.org>
> Cc: Jordy Stringer
> Subject: [Jobs] tips for an individual conducting an interview.
> 
>  
> 
> Greetings friends and colleagues.
> I come to you with a question about an interview tip, not in the manner
you may think though. Tomorrow as part of my new administrative
responsibilities for the very first time I will be interviewing cited
individuals, and Im curious to know if theres any thoughts on questions I
might be able to ask that would give me a sense of their level of
professional dress. For about five weeks Ive been painstakingly developing
questions that will get at the core of what I need to as far as the job
responsibilities, but I am at a bit of a loss with  this aspect. I certainly
want my questions to be both professional and legal. Any thoughts?
> 
>  
> 
> 





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