[nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with tree

sarah.jevnikar at utoronto.ca sarah.jevnikar at utoronto.ca
Sat Aug 14 22:18:11 UTC 2010


Hi all,
A few people have mentioned echolocation. I've seen youtube videos of  
it, but how do you all use it?
Just curious,
Sarah


Quoting Ashley  Bramlett <bookwormahb at earthlink.net>:

> Hi Anmol and all,
> No don't place your hand in front at all times, but yes I think its
> reasonable to place an arm up or something to protect you when you are
> coming to an obstacle like a branch.  You can perceive this through
> echolocation or if its familiar you remember the overhanging obstacle.
>
> Ashley
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Anmol Bhatia" <anmolpbhatia at yahoo.com>
> To: "National Association of Blind Students mailing list" <nabs-l at nfbnet.org>
> Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2010 5:29 PM
> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with tree
>
>
>> Good points Sean!
>> To who ever said to keep your hand in frunt to prevent the branch   
>> from hitting you, we do not when a tree is in frunt and the   
>> branches are hanging out so does this mean we should walk around   
>> with our hand in frunt at all times?
>> Anmol
>>
>>
>> --- On Sat, 8/14/10, Sean Whalen <smwhalenpsp at gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> From: Sean Whalen <smwhalenpsp at gmail.com>
>>> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with tree
>>> To: nabs-l at nfbnet.org
>>> Date: Saturday, August 14, 2010, 4:22 PM
>>> Thank you Dennis!
>>>
>>> You said everything I wanted to say, and then some.
>>>
>>> If the man was injured and incurred costs from the injury,
>>> he has a case. A
>>> sighted person could sue in the circumstances described
>>> where the branch is
>>> not illuminated at night. The limb causing injury is
>>> foreseeable, and
>>> somebody was negligent.
>>>
>>> A few other thoughts brought up by the discussion so far:
>>>
>>> The idea that I should always have my hand in front of my
>>> face is
>>> ridiculous. If it works for you, I'm not knocking it, but
>>> it certainly isn't
>>> a requirement of safe travel.
>>>
>>> Walking at a somewhat reduced pace in unfamiliar areas
>>> seems reasonable. I
>>> do it, and I don't think that exercising some caution
>>> indicates that I have
>>> subpar travel skills. Once you are familiar with an area,
>>> it is certainly
>>> easier to navigate it more quickly.
>>>
>>> Kirt is right in that this maybe shouldn't be news, but
>>> neither should a
>>> blind person graduating from a university, and I see that
>>> kind of thing
>>> written up frequently. Blindness is different, and makes a
>>> story more
>>> interesting to the general public. Not saying I like it,
>>> just saying it's
>>> so.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
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>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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>
>
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