[nabs-l] [stylist] Instead of Cars, Jobs

Jorge Paez jorgeapaez at mac.com
Thu Aug 26 16:22:01 UTC 2010


Its a little more complicated then simply using GPS technology.
It requires some scanners to spot obsticles arround it, directional mechanisms such as a compass so it can tell itself where it is, etc., but certainly doable if you have the right funds.




On Aug 26, 2010, at 1:32 AM, Anmol Bhatia wrote:

> Good idea Jewel. Realisticly would you suggest would much more likely to happen then cars that blind people can drive. What you are suggesting can actually be achieved I am sure of this. It would just require some thinking. Perhaps using the technology in current GPS devices to make what you are suggesting happen. But I think it can be done.
> Anmol
> I seldom think about my limitations, and they never make me sad. Perhaps there is just a touch of yearning at times; but it is vague, like a breeze among flowers.
> Hellen Keller
> 
> 
> --- On Thu, 8/26/10, Jewel S. <herekittykat2 at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> From: Jewel S. <herekittykat2 at gmail.com>
>> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] [stylist] Instead of Cars, Jobs
>> To: "National Association of Blind Students mailing list" <nabs-l at nfbnet.org>
>> Date: Thursday, August 26, 2010, 12:35 AM
>> On the subject of transportation and
>> the alternatives to the dreaded
>> buses and such...why haven't they developed something much
>> simpler,
>> like a motorized scooter that has a system for feedback
>> that a cane
>> provides...I imagine it is difficult to use a cane from a
>> motorized
>> scooter or wheelchair...what are the alternatives? I know
>> about the K
>> Sonar...but they say that it is not a replacement but
>> should be used
>> *with* the white cane...what else is avaialble? Why not
>> create
>> something like what they are working on for the blind
>> driver challenge
>> for wheelchairs that points out obstacles and indicates how
>> to avoid
>> stuff like that? What do you guys think of this? Motorized
>> wheelchairs
>> and scooters go much slower than cars, and have far fewer
>> dangers
>> since they are on sidewalks where there aren't
>> high-speeding vehicles
>> to watch out for...but I think it'd be a great tool. Or
>> what about
>> those things that people stand on that are motorized, like
>> min-scooters...you know, like some mall cops use? I forgot
>> what they
>> are called...anyone remember? We could maybe figure out
>> some way of
>> making those easier to use by the blind?
>> 
>> I know I for one would be grateful for an easier way to get
>> around
>> than my own two feet...I have mobility and balance issues
>> and
>> sometimes struggle a lot walking around town. I'd be soo
>> grateful for
>> some way of navigating with a a small motorized mobility
>> tool like a
>> scooter or that thing mall cops use. Ideas? Comments?
>> 
>> ~Jewel
>> 
>> On 8/25/10, Sean Whalen <smwhalenpsp at gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>>> There is absolutely no way that blind people will be
>> driving cars on
>>> America's roadways within 10 years, or 20 for that
>> matter. I highly doubt
>>> whether it will even be technically feasible in 10
>> years, but am absolutely
>>> certain that such a system will not have gained the
>> requisite widespread
>>> public acceptance within that time frame.
>>> 
>>> Having a generation of literate blind children would
>> open more employment
>>> opportunities than a car operable by the blind. So
>> will the slow, but
>>> persistent, shifting of public attitudes relative to
>> the capacities of blind
>>> people. The idea that the existence of a car drivable
>> by blind people will
>>> all of a sudden create employment opportunities is, in
>> my opinion,
>>> misguided. I also don't by the idea that seeing a
>> blind person operating a
>>> vehicle will shift public attitudes significantly. I
>> think people will be
>>> impressed as hell by the technology, but am not
>> convinced that they will
>>> view blind people as any more capable.
>>> 
>>> I'm not saying that it wouldn't be nice to hop in a
>> car and go where I want
>>> to go when I want to go there, but there are a number
>> of ways the resources
>>> being poured into this project could be better spent.
>> They have been
>>> outlined here before, so I won't go into that here. I
>> surely understand that
>>> there will be advancements in technology made, which
>> will benefit the
>>> sighted and the blind alike, because of the ambitious
>> undertaking of such a
>>> project. The work that is being done is impressive,
>> interesting and
>>> innovative. It just seems to me that, given the fact
>> that we are working
>>> with limited resources, we could focus them elsewhere
>> with more immediate
>>> effect.
>>> 
>>> Sean
>>> 
>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> nabs-l mailing list
>>> nabs-l at nfbnet.org
>>> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/nabs-l_nfbnet.org
>>> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your
>> account info for
>>> nabs-l:
>>> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/options/nabs-l_nfbnet.org/herekittykat2%40gmail.com
>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> ~Jewel
>> Check out my blog about accessibility for the blind!
>> Treasure Chest for the Blind: http://blindtreasurechest.blogspot.com
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> nabs-l mailing list
>> nabs-l at nfbnet.org
>> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/nabs-l_nfbnet.org
>> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your
>> account info for nabs-l:
>> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/options/nabs-l_nfbnet.org/anmolpbhatia%40yahoo.com
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> nabs-l mailing list
> nabs-l at nfbnet.org
> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/nabs-l_nfbnet.org
> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for nabs-l:
> http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/options/nabs-l_nfbnet.org/jorgeapaez%40mac.com





More information about the nabs-l mailing list