[nabs-l] Why are you even taking a bio lab?

Jamie Principato blackbyrdfly at gmail.com
Mon Nov 8 05:37:34 UTC 2010


I don't have much to say here. I certainly value the opinions of others, and
their right to have them, but speaking as a student who has been fighting
for access to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math courses at my own
university, and one who has been asked before why I don't simply switch to a
major that doesn't require such courses, or simply get through the ones I
need and avoid any other sciences, I have to say that it really does make me
sick to my stomach to see someone ask the *future* of the organized blind a
question about lab access and be met with a statement like the subject line
of this e-mail. I think it's because a good number of blind students feel
this way, because we're so quick to avoid potential access issues and let
someone else fight the good fight that anyone needs to fight to begin with.
I think this is, in part, why blind students can walk into Biology or
Chemistry or Physics labs across the country and be told that the lab
coordinator simply has no idea how they can possibly be successful in that
particular course. They ask theselves the same question asked here. Why
would this student even try to take this class if they can't see to do it
efficiently?

I'm sorry if you disagree with me... very sorry, in fact. I just can't stand
to watch blind people reach this particular dead end in their search for
access advice without making my two cents available.

As for the access issue itself, I agree with the person who suggested asking
very specific questions, though when you don't know what you're looking for,
it can sometimes be hard tot hink of which questions to ask. You might
consider making a list of the things you'd think you should know about,
size, color, movement patterns, etc, and show this to your professor. He or
she can likely let you know if you're missing some key piece of information
for your data.

-Jamie

On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 12:01 AM, Cindy Bennett <clb5590 at gmail.com> wrote:

> You might not use it again, but everyone going onto grad school will
> be so thankful that they learned it. Even if they don't use that same
> program, they'll at least have statistical software experience, and
> that is better than nothing when you have to analyze your own data for
> a thesis, but I understand how this process has been frustrating for
> you.
>
> And, even if someone is not majoring in the sciences but has an
> interest in a class, then I don't think they should avoid it because
> of blindness, but that goes into a whole other issue. I just thought I
> would share a different opinion. I had a very positive experience with
> biology.
>
> Cindy
>
> On 11/7/10, Ian Perrault <iperrault at hotmail.com> wrote:
> > I'm majoring in Public Administration, thank god not Biology! It's just
> an
> > Introduction to Statistical Analysis course, just basic Statistics, and
> we
> > need this stupid program. I don't know why, because I'll probably never
> use
> > it again!
> >
> >
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>
>
> --
> Cindy Bennett
> uNC Wilmington Psychology major
>
> clb5590 at gmail.com
> 828.989.5383
>
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