[nabs-l] schools

Joshua Lester jlester8462 at students.pccua.edu
Thu Aug 25 16:38:05 UTC 2011


Keri, it's Joshua Lester.
I E-mailed you, yesterday.
Please respond.
Thanks, Joshua

On 8/25/11, keri <wvucountrygirl729 at gmail.com> wrote:
> I had had mixed opinions about this school, and i really feel that i rushed
> into the school before i fully did my research, but they were so unorganized
> and disability services were so rude.
> keri
>
> "Sometimes your nearness takes my breath away; and all the things I want to
> say can find no voice. Then, in silence, I can only hope my eyes will speak
> my heart."
> --Robert Sexton
>
> "For every beauty there is an eye somewhere to see it. For every truth there
> is an ear somewhere to hear it. For every love there is a heart somewhere to
> receive it."
> --Ivan Panin
>
> Find that guy that will pick up every piece of your shattered heart & put it
> back together; Replacing it with a piece of his.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Arielle Silverman" <arielle71 at gmail.com>
> To: "National Association of Blind Students mailing list"
> <nabs-l at nfbnet.org>
> Sent: Thursday, August 25, 2011 12:32 AM
> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] schools
>
>
>> Hi Kerri,
>> Would you be willing to tell us what happened? Depending on what it
>> was, we might be able to suggest some things you can do to avoid
>> having it happen again, regardless of what school you decide to
>> attend. As blind students, there are a number of things we can do to
>> plan ahead and be able to get the best possible education regardless
>> of the school's attitudes toward blind students.
>> Best,
>> Arielle
>>
>> On 8/24/11, bookwormahb at earthlink.net <bookwormahb at earthlink.net> wrote:
>>> Kerri,
>>> Your questions are very broad and one could write a book on college
>>> experiences.
>>> I don't have too much time, but I'll try and summarize my experience and
>>> answer your questions.
>>>
>>> Selecting a college should be based on how you like the school; do you
>>> want
>>> a large school or a small school and small classes?  Do you want one with
>>> diversity? A religious private school adhereing to your beliefs?  I
>>> recommend touring a school and even visiting a few classes if you can.
>>> See
>>> how you like it. Of course the school may  be determined on who accepts
>>> you. But if several schools accept you, you can choose.
>>> Also, I recommend having the solid academic skills; if your grades are
>>> only
>>> average, you may want to attend a community college to start. College
>>> admission is very competetive now.  Some scores accept the SAT, others
>>> the
>>> ACT, and some don't require any scores.
>>> You do not want to get to college and struggle with the basics that they
>>> assume you have.
>>> Also, have a way to take notes, have good computer skills, and if you
>>> live
>>> in a dorm know how to do laundry, hang clothes, make a bed, and other
>>> basic
>>> daily tasks. You will need computer skills such as typing in Word, basic
>>> formatting in Word like Bold, centering, spell checking etc. Know the
>>> internet and email too.
>>>
>>> I say this because such skills help you in college. No one is perfect and
>>> other life skills will be practiced and sharpened in college.  I mean
>>> such
>>> skills as planning a schedule; I used my braille note calendar for that.
>>> Also notetaking and test taking skills are important. You should be a
>>> good
>>> advocate to your professor; communication skills are important too. And,
>>> finally, if you live in a dorm, you'll want to go out with friends or
>>> shopping alone and maybe out to eat; so have a system to identify money.
>>> If
>>> your parents can assist you in getting a bank account and a  debit card,
>>> this will help a lot.
>>>
>>> So what college did I go to? I attended George Mason University as  a
>>> commuter; I heard some nasty things went on in the  dorms and did not
>>> have
>>> the confidence to walk so far from the dorm, so I wanted to commute. I
>>> transferred to a small school, Marymount university, and liked it there.
>>> I
>>> had a roommate on campus some semesters and experience the ups and downs
>>> of
>>> a public bathroom.
>>> What was my major?
>>> I couldn't decide; I tried to be an education major and got too
>>> discouraged.
>>> I  was a
>>> liberal studies major; so a general BA degree focussing on psychology and
>>> communication.
>>>
>>> How were disability services? At GMU they were huge; the DSO was  large
>>> and
>>> more impersonal. You met with a counselor and filled out an accomodation
>>> form and took a copy to your professors.
>>> GMU provided more services, but when they scanned texts it was not always
>>> efficient; I'd get the text after I needed it; but they improved since I
>>> left.
>>> Accomodations included: accessible texts via electronic format or
>>> Learning
>>> Ally, testing accomodations such as extended time and alternative formats
>>> including braille, copies of professor's notes and handouts that he/she
>>> showed to the class, human notetakers, and computers with adaptive
>>> software
>>> like jaws.
>>>
>>> At MU it was only one DSO counselor and she really new students by name.
>>> They had less services. I was not able to get braille tests; they said
>>> the
>>> equipment was too expensive. But they did procure jaws for the library.
>>> I worked out accomodations with professors though and did not run into
>>> much
>>> trouble. My hardest thing in college was access to textbooks and
>>> research.
>>> The library had a wealth of material such as encyclopedias, reference
>>> books,
>>> periodicals, etc which is not accessible.
>>> I used readers to get me through those research tasks.
>>> At MU services were: accessible texts if available, testing
>>> accomodations,
>>> electronic handouts from the professors, human notetakers, and adaptive
>>> software on the public computers. They put jaws in the library and one
>>> computer lab.
>>>
>>> So college is tough, but its hard for any student. I found the pace of
>>> classes rather stressful. I even got extentions on some papers
>>> occasionally.
>>> But some classes were very interesting and some professors could be
>>> entertaining.  I enjoyed the class discussions too. It fostered my
>>> thinking
>>> skills and gave me some new perspective on an issue or topic.
>>> I suggest finding a major you like and one that will prepare you with
>>> skills
>>> for your desired career. If you do not know what you wish to study, you
>>> can
>>> go undeclared for a year or two. Another suggestion is if you are caught
>>> between two majors, either do both or decide on your best one; take some
>>> classes in both areas and talk to those students in those majors.
>>> This way you can get a feel for the work involved in that area of study.
>>>
>>> Ashley
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: keri
>>> Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 1:51 PM
>>> To: nabs-l at nfbnet.org
>>> Subject: [nabs-l] schools
>>>
>>> I'm looking to hear of personal experiences with colleges.
>>> what college did you attend, your major, how was the accessibleness for
>>> you,
>>> and how were disability services there.
>>> keri
>>>
>>> "Sometimes your nearness takes my breath away; and all the things I want
>>> to
>>> say can find no voice. Then, in silence, I can only hope my eyes will
>>> speak
>>> my heart."
>>> --Robert Sexton
>>>
>>> "For every beauty there is an eye somewhere to see it. For every truth
>>> there
>>> is an ear somewhere to hear it. For every love there is a heart somewhere
>>>
>>> to
>>> receive it."
>>> --Ivan Panin
>>>
>>> Find that guy that will pick up every piece of your shattered heart & put
>>>
>>> it
>>> back together; Replacing it with a piece of his.
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>>
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