<!-- saved from url=(0022)http://internet.e-mail -->
<html><body bgcolor="black">

<center><img alt="IMAGE OF A COLORFUL WHOZIT" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/whozit_on_white.PNG" /></center>

<div align="center" style="bgcolor: gray;"><div align="left" style="width: 760px; bgcolor: black;">


<h1><center><b><big><font color="white">COMPETITION CORNER</h1>
<br /><br />
THE NEWSLETTER OF THE SPORTS AND RECREATION DIVISION
<br /><br />
VOLUME 2, #4<br />
November 2008
<br /><br />
Edited By<br />
Lisamaria Martinez<br />

</font color></big></b></center>
<br /><br /><br />
<hr />
<h3><center><b><font color="yellow">TABLE OF CONTENTS</font color></b></center></h3>
<br /><br />
<font color="yellow">
<a href="#a1">THE PRESIDENT'S PITCH, By Lisamaria Martinez</a>
<br />
<a href="#a2">INTERVIEW WITH PARALYMPIC JUDO BRONZE MEDALIST, GREG DEWALL, By Stacy Cervenka</a>
<br />
<a href="#a3">DREAM BIG, WORK HARD, ACHIEVE! By Jessica Lorenz</a>
<br />
<a href="#a4">A FEW NOTES ABOUT TANDEM BICYCLES, By Ron Burzese</a>
<br />  
<a href="#a5">FETA-SPINACH SALMON ROST, Submitted By Lisamaria Martinez</a>
</font color>
<br /><br /><br />

<center><img alt="IMAGE OF MULTIPLE WHOZITS STRIDING ACROSS THE PAGE" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/multiple_whozits.png" /></center>

<h1><center><b><font color="yellow">

<a name="a1">THE PRESIDENT'S PITCH<br />
By Lisamaria Martinez</a>
</font color></b></center></h1>
<br /><br />
<font color="white">

<p />Competition Corner is the publication of the Sports and Recreation Division of the National Federation of the Blind. Members can expect to read an update from the president of the Sports and Recreation Division as well as a variety of articles and web links that may be of interest to blind individuals who are interested in--or passionate about--health, fitness and recreational and competitive sports activities. 

<p />This edition is chalk full of exciting articles. Two of the three articles reflect upon the 2008 Beijing Paralympics and spotlights bronze medal winning judo athlete Greg DeWall and the gold medal winning women's goalball team. The final article, by Ron Burzese, is an article I thought I'd include in the Competition Corner edition appearing before the holidays. Family members, friends, or loved ones may consider reading this article before purchasing that tandem bike your blind relative/friend/spouse has been hinting about.

<p />The Sports and Recreation Division Board wants to be one of the very first to wish all of you a very happy holiday season. Enjoy this edition and may it bring you good cheer for the remainder of this 2008 year. The S&R Board is working hard to bring all of you a fantastic 2009 year.
 
<p />As always, keep a close eye on your email in-box and your finger off the delete button for the next edition of Competition Corner. 
</font color>
<br /><br />
<hr />

<h1><center><b><font color="yellow">
<a name="a2">INTERVIEW WITH PARALYMPIC JUDO BRONZE MEDALIST, GREG DEWALL<br />By Stacy Cervenka</a>
</font color></b></center></h1>
<br /><br /> 

<font color="white">
<p />On January 20, 1997 at one o'clock in the morning, Greg DeWall made the decision to end his life. Like most high school seniors, DeWall felt an enormous amount of pressure from his parents, teachers, and coaches to make many crucial decisions in the next few months that would determine the course of his life. Should he join the military? Should he go to college? If so, what should he study? A talented high school athlete, Greg knew he might be eligible for a wrestling scholarship, but were his grades good enough? The future was pounding on his door and Greg was not quite sure yet how to answer. So, while his family slept, Greg got out of bed, took down the shotgun from his bedroom wall, placed it under his chin, and pulled the trigger.    

<p />Eleven and a half years later, DeWall stood on the podium at the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing, China and accepted the bronze medal in judo for the United States. DeWall, now totally blind as a result of his self-inflicted gunshot injury, had competed in the over 100kg division and was the only member of the US Paralympic judo team to come home with a medal.

<p />Judo, a grappling martial art invented in Japan, is one of the most popular sports among blind athletes throughout the world and is also one of the few sports in which blind athletes can compete against sighted athletes at the highest levels with almost no adaptations or accommodations. Judo has been a part of the Paralympic Summer Games since 1988 and several blind judoka (judo players) have been nationally ranked alongside their sighted peers.

<p />Stacy Cervenka recently sat down with DeWall and talked to him about judo, blindness, and his unique journey from that life-changing moment almost 12 years ago to his life-changing moment in Beijing and his life today as a successful athlete and college student.

<center><img alt="IMAGE OF 3 JUDO WHOZITS LINED UP IN A ROW" heighth="200" width="137.5" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/judo_whozit.PNG" />
<img heighth="200" width="137.5" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/judo_whozit.PNG" />
<img heighth="200" width="137.5" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/judo_whozit.PNG" /></center>

<p />Q: Tell us about your life before your injury. What sports did you play?

<p />A: I have found it easiest to describe myself as the all-American boy. Growing up in a blue collar home with an older brother and younger sister, my parents were always trying to make ends meet. As kids, though, we never felt like we went without. 

<p />My brother and I participated in athletics year round. I was involved in a half dozen different sports prior to high school. As a freshman at Pleasant Valley High School in Chico, California, I needed to narrow down my sports of choice. I chose to focus on wrestling, baseball, and football.

<p />My free time was usually spent fishing and hunting with my brother or friend, Ryan. Another extracurricular activity I was involved in was 4H. For ten years or more, I raised lambs and hogs for market. At the end of a five month period with these animals, we would show them at the local fair and then put them up for sale at the livestock auction.

<p />Q: Describe the events that led up to your suicide attempt.

<p />A: As a senior in high school, I was very confused and often felt lost. Looking back on it now, it is easy to say that all the problems I had were good problems to have. I felt a lot of pressure from different angles. I was a successful wrestler who was expected to repeat as section champion and qualify for the state tournament. My father was constantly talking to me about the military. My mother and others were regularly asking me about college and what I wanted to do after high school. During this time, I was also trying to get my grades up.

<p />I spent the day of my suicide attempt like any normal weekend. I was seventeen; it was three weeks short of my eighteenth birthday. I went duck hunting that morning and then played some softball in the afternoon with my dad and girlfriend. I followed that up with a nice dinner with my girlfriend. That night, something changed. I lay in bed for hours wrestling with self-doubt and fear. The airport lights behind the house would blink through my bedroom window. With the blinking lights, I could see all my medals and awards from the sports I had participated in over the past four years. I remember thinking, this all means nothing. In May when I graduate, all these achievements and successes will mean nothing. I had no idea at that moment what I was going to do with my future after high school. I had plenty of options; I knew that. I was so confused that I was afraid to choose one. On an impulse, I got out of bed and grabbed my shot-gun from the wall. It took less than thirty seconds from the original thought of doing it to actually pulling the trigger.

<p />Q: Tell us about the events immediately after the gunshot. When did you realize that you were never going to regain your eyesight and that you were going to remain blind? How did this affect you?

<p />A: Unfortunately, my mother and sister were home when I pulled the trigger. My mom found me in my room hunched over with my faceless head in my hands. When the paramedics arrived, they informed me that the stretcher would not fit down the hall. I was asked if I was able to walk. So I did.

<p />I spent six weeks in the hospital originally. During this time, many tests were run. I knew shortly into my hospital stay that, because my optic nerves were destroyed, I would never regain vision in either eye. Accepting blindness came quickly. It was the adjusting that was hard.

<p />My parents didnít waste any time when it came to helping me adjust. The day after I returned home from the hospital, my father put a ceiling fan in front of me and told me to put it together.

<p />Q: Besides blindness, what other complications resulted from the gunshot?

<p />A: The blindness has actually been the least of my issues as a result of my attempt. I suffered major damage and disfiguration of my face. I have had to undergo over a dozen reconstructive surgeries so far. The most significant thing I deal with is my speech trouble. Until my oral cavity is completely reconstructed, my speech will never sound like it did before the injury.

<p />Q: Before you took up judo, did you think blind people could participate in sports? If so, what sports did you do as a blind person prior to joining the judo club?

<p />A: I had heard mentioned a few sports that had blind competitors or even sports that were designed for the blind. I had never pursued any of these sports, however. The Chico area doesn't have a large enough blind community to have organized blind athletic events. Before becoming a part of the United States Association of Blind Athletes and participating in judo, I wrestled in junior college and wake-boarded. I still do a lot of wake-boarding and water-skiing today.

<p />Q: When and why did you take up judo?

<p />A: I took up judo because I was overweight. During a visit to my doctor, I shared with him that I wanted to lose weight and that I was looking for an aerobic activity. He was a former judo player and knew that it was a blind friendly sport. He suggested judo and I signed up for classes that day at Haley's Martial Arts Center. Judo started as a recreation activity for me. It eventually evolved into competition.

<p />Q: How did your sensei and the other students react to having a blind classmate when you first started? Has this changed and, if so, how?

<p />A: Coach Carl Tenckhoff was the head coach of the Chico Judo Club and he was uncertain about having me there in the beginning. 

<p />Coach Jason Parks took me one on one and was convinced that I could learn judo. In a short time, I had the class convinced that I could practice with them and that I belonged. 

<p />With my recent success, the members of the club know now that not only I, but other blind folks, can be successful with judo.

<p />Q: What are some alternative techniques that you use as a blind person to learn the throws, holds, etc?

<p />A: It is always hard to stand there while the coach is verbally describing a move. Often I get lost in the translation. Whenever it is a smaller class, it is beneficial for the blind student to receive some one on one time from the coach. More often then not, I get matched up with an experienced judo player for practice. It always helps to work with someone who is comfortable with the move being practiced as well as confident with it. Usually my partner is able to tell me when I am doing something wrong and instruct me on how to correct it. Hands on learning is really the most efficient tool for teaching judo to a blind athlete.

<p />Q: How did you become a member of the US Blind Judo Team?

<p />A: I was participating at only my fourth tournament in San Jose. I was still a white belt at the time. Members and staff of the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) were present and witnessed me win my division with a record of 4 wins, 0 losses. Mark Lucas, the Executive Director of the USABA, approached me later about being the heavy-weight on the blind judo team.

<p />I was hesitant at first. After talking with a couple of coaches and staff for the USABA, I had decided to give it a chance.

<p />Q: How did you qualify for the Paralympics?

<p />A: Two years prior to the Paralympic Games, qualifying tournaments begin. According to your respective finish at each of these international tournaments, you earn points. These points will then add up through the duration of the international tournaments prior to the Paralympics. The World Championships the year before the Paralympics is an exception. You still earn points based on your finish, which ultimately will help improve your ranking, but if you finish sixth or better, you automatically qualify the weight class for your country. If an athlete does not finish in the top six, he or she then must rely on the points earned up to the date to get invited to the Paralympic Games.

<p />Since I was the new guy and had not yet competed in an international tournament, I had no points to back me up should I not qualify at the World Championships last year in Sao Paulo, Brazil. With a lot of luck on my side and my "refuse to lose" attitude, I squeaked out a fifth place finish. I followed up that tournament with a 2nd place finish at the Para-Pan-American Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

<p />Q: How and where did you train for the Paralympics? 

<p />A: As I mentioned earlier, I started judo with the Chico Judo Club of Haleyís Martial Arts Center. Eight months before leaving for China, I temporarily relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area to train six days a week. The coach of the Paralympic team, Raul Tamayo, is also the coach at Stanford University. Four days a week we would train there. Raul runs a very intense and productive practice. He will never let you cut corners and makes sure you are doing the move right before moving on. The other two days a week, we would practice at Cahill's Judo Academy in San Bruno, California, under legendary coach Willy Cahill, who has coached many, many Olympic and Paralympic athletes. Cahillís is another atmosphere all together. After a solid thirty minute warm up, it is sixty minutes of fighting. I would usually spend fifty minutes picking myself up off the floor after being thrown around by currently ranked judo players as well as former Olympians. The other ten minutes, I would spend sucking down water.

<p />Sunday was our only day off, as long as we didnít have a tournament.

<p />Q: Tell us about your time at the Paralympics. 

<p />A: We spent a few days in Colorado Springs at the Olympic Training Center before leaving for China, so when we got there, I didnít feel anything other then tired and hungry. Fortunately, we had been up for hours and we arrived in time to eat dinner and go to bed soon thereafter. When I woke up the next morning and realized I was waking up in the Olympic Village, it gave me goose bumps. The magnitude of why I was there began to set in at that moment. That has no comparison to how I felt the evening prior to competition day.

<p />The evening before my day to compete was the worst hurricane of emotions I never want to experience again. I felt lost at see as the world seemed to spin around me. I couldnít tell you what I was thinking about, because I couldnít string a thought or a sentence together in the condition I was in. Finally, I made it to my room after forcing down my dinner. While listening to music, I must have drifted off to sleep. Next thing I knew, it was time to wake up and go weigh in for the competition. Like it had never happened, the nerves and the storm of emotions were gone. I was ready to fight!

<p />Another memory I will take away from these games is pinning the Cuban judoka, Jargaliny Jimenez. He was the reigning world champion and I took him down in the first round. Secondly, I'll always remember hearing my name announced over the loud speaker as a representative of the United States of America. Finally, and most importantly, my family was there to witness it. It was special to have them all in China with me on that day.

<p />Q: Has your perception of blindness and disability changed since your own injury and if so, how?

<p />A: I canít say that I ever had a perception of blind people. So I donít know that it would have changed. My perception now though is that we are underestimated. I have learned over the years that, like all human beings, we do have limits, but all the successful blind people I've come in contact with have succeeded because they've pushed their limits and eliminated these limits by being resourceful and knowing how to improvise. As technology advances, there are going to be less and less limitations for people who are blind. Also, with the movement towards inclusion in our public schools, more of the general public will become educated and exposed to not only blind students, but students with various physical disabilities.

<p />Q: What do you feel you've learned on your journey from the night of the gunshot to the Paralympics?

<p />A: As far as learning to deal with my emotions, I have learned to wait another day. You really donít know how good the highs feel if you donít experience the lows along with them. So wait another day. If today was so bad that life seems unbearable, tomorrow could change things.

<p />As far as what I have learned about myself, I learned I am mentally strong enough to do what it takes. There are so many opportunities in life to just give up. Well, thatís what I did twelve years ago. I slowly have been getting my life back in order and am now a senior at Chico State University, where I'm majoring in Recreation Administration. At a major junction in my life, I was offered a mountain to climb. At the top of this mountain was the Paralympic podium. To reach the top would take many sacrifices. I had no doubt my body could handle the challenge. My mental strength, on the other hand, was in question. I needed to know that two thirds of the way my mind would not quit on me.

<p />I remember five or six months into my training, I doubted what I was doing and why I was doing it. Always in the back of my mind, I could hear myself saying, quitting is not an option. I soon got over that hump and was able to coast right in to the Paralympic games probably at my peak.

<p />My short judo career is something I chose to do to improve my life. Without sounding selfish, I chose to climb that mountain for myself. I did not do it by myself. But I needed to climb that mountain. I needed to know for myself that I could handle what it would take to not only go, but to be victorious. I proved to myself that I can handle it.

<p />Q: What are your future athletic goals?

<p />A: Right now, the Paralympic Games in London in 2012 are on the calendar. My mother and sister really loved traveling to Beijing and say they could get used to all this international travel! They tell me I donít have a choice. We are going to London and I am the reason why. The next twelve months are going to be taken easy though. I put my life on hold to prepare and qualify for the Games. I have some time to make up for. Finishing my degree is at the top of my list.

<p />Q: What are your future goals outside of athletics?

<p />A: As I mentioned, finishing my degree in Recreation Administration at Chico State University is at the top of my list. In the next year or so, I hope to complete my internship and then look for employment. With that being said, judo will definitely influence where I start my professional career. Ultimately, the next year or more will be dedicated to education and vocation.

<p />Q: Where would you like to see yourself ten years from now?

<p />A: This is probably the hardest question yet! All I know now is that I want to help people. I know that it is what I will be doing in ten years. On what stage though, I donít know. I'm interested in working on military bases with the spouses and children of deployed soldiers or possibly in the prison system with the incarcerated population or perhaps with children with disabilities or chronic illnesses. I've worked managing the weight room at a Boys and Girls Club and I also teach kids' judo classes several days a week. I find that working with kids can be very rewarding. Kids tend to help you as much as you help them.

<p />Q: What advice would you give to other blind people who are interested in taking up judo?

<p />A: Judo is a very rewarding recreational activity as well as a competitive sport. I would recommend judo even if a person was only interested in exercise and self-defense. It will significantly improve your agility and self confidence. Those who want to take it to the next level and train for competition will find that judo is still rewarding. It just takes another level of commitment and discipline

<p />Whether you are getting involved for recreational purposes or to compete, experiment with as many dojos and coaches as you can find. Donít waste your time with a coach or a club that is not going to give you the benefit of the doubt and work with you. 

<p />Also, donít get discouraged in the beginning. A lot of people without disabilities donít last two weeks in judo, because it is hard. So, don't think that the reason you're not getting something right away is because you're blind. Judo is a rough combat sport. Even the black belts still practice the basics. So donít be like those people without disabilities who only last two weeks. Have patience and believe that, with time and practice, you will get it.

<p />Greg is willing to give advice to anyone who is interested in taking up judo. Feel free to <a href="mailto:gdewall@mail.csuchico.edu">contact him</a> with questions on how and where to get started, the various alternative techniques used by blind judoka, and how to get involved with the United States Association of Blind Athletes' judo program. 
</font color>
<br /><br /><br />
<hr />

<h1><center><b><font color="yellow">
<a name="a3">DREAM BIG, WORK HARD, ACHIEVE!<br>By Jessica Lorenz 
</a></font color></b></center></h1>

<font color="white">
<p />I recently returned from Beijing where I competed in the second largest sporting event in the world, the 2008 Paralympics. Paralympic athletes include people who are blind, amputees, people who have cerebral palsy, people who use wheelchairs and people with dwarfism. The Paralympics does not include individuals with intellectual disabilities. 

<p />The first Paralympics was held in Rome in 1960 and included 400 athletes. The 2008 Beijing Games included 4200 athletes representing 147 countries. The 2008 Paralympic delegation from the United States included 213 athletes, 24 of whom were visually impaired. But most importantly, the Paralympic games is about athletes, not disability.

<p />I am a member of the USA Women's Goalball team that won gold in Beijing. I am only starting to realize the meaning of winning a gold medal; as days go by the meaning continues to sink in. My Paralympic experience taught me how to dream big and to work hard. I spent years getting up early, working out, eating right, teaching myself mental relaxation and focusing techniques, fine tuning my game and going to the gym or training camps rather than to parties or on vacations. My entire being was dedicated to one express purpose, winning gold. I worked towards this goal with greater tenacity than I have dedicated to anything else in my life. Each time I would struggle to fit in a work out I would think about winning the gold. When I had a bad practice I would re-play my mistakes in my head in order to correct them through either strength conditioning or by changing my body mechanics.

<p />I put in 100 hours on the court in the last year simply doing drills designed to improve my footwork. Add to that another 400 hours actually playing the game- and you get a lot of time spent on a goalball court. One of the most important aspects of my game is my speed and my cardio vascular conditioning. My Body Mass Index is very low and my VO2 max very high. Not only do I run a lot, but I have been regularly tested to make sure that I am constantly improving. I pushed myself in ways I never had to in order to get to Beijing and come home with the medal I planned to come home with around my neck.

<p />The Paralympics is nothing like competing in sports for folks with disabilities in the United States. In China we played in front of a standing room only crowd of 6000 spectators- which was rather remarkable all in and of itself! During the 96 Atlanta games the final games attracted less than 500 spectators. Think of the atmosphere of a division one basketball game- those were the competition conditions in Beijing- it was lots of fun!

<p />I did not feel quite prepared for the mayhem that occurs directly following a gold medal win. Two of my teammates were immediately taken for drug testing after our game. There is a limited amount of time to go and change into the medal attire. There were 100 or so other players from other countries who were in the athletes section of the venue congratulating us and posing for photos. We had a press conference with the Chinese team. The press conference was full of drama- including a protest of the game by the Chinese coach; all of this in the 45 minutes between the final game and the medal ceremony.

<p />All of China's teams played hard. They have really helped to raise the bar in women's goalball and I am honored to have competed against them. Going into the gold medal game the USA had two tie games and one loss where as China was undefeated.  The competition venue Was state of the art and my Paralympic experience has given me a great deal of respect for China's Paralympic training program. The Chinese have a Paralympic training center that dedicates two courts exclusively to the goalball program. China's men won gold and their women battled it out with the USA to take the silver in their Paralympic debut

<p />Nothing is like standing on that medal podium and hearing our national anthem play. As I touched the medal for the first time, I was keenly aware of how many people touched part of this dream. Behind every athlete is a partner, friends, family, co-workers and coaches- I happen to have the best of all of these supporting me.

<p />One oddity with having all visually impaired people on the podium was our challenge in finding the appropriate direction to gaze in to show the flag our respect. One of our players spotted it though- so there we were, right hands on heart, singing along, most  of us with tears in our eyes- for all the world to see that the USA has the best woman's goalball team in the world.

<p />I know what it feels like to be the best in the world at something and I had the honor of playing with some amazing women on the USA team. One of the interesting things about this particular team is its depth of talent- each of us bring very different gifts to the game.  I keep the ball from going into the net- so  I need to be quick and cardiovascularly fit. I depend on some of my teammates to have big muscles so that they can throw the ball through our opponentís defensive line up. Each player on the USA Women's Team dedicated their lives to gold in preparation for these games. Gold was our collective dream- not unlike equality of opportunity is the collective dream for many of us who are blind. The USA Woman's Goalball team came home with gold. I believe that hard work and our collective dream of gold are what brought this team to the top of the podium. 

<p />My message to all: Dream big. Work hard. Achieve!
</font color>
<br /><br /><br />
<hr />


<h1><center><b><font color="yellow">
<a name="a4">A FEW NOTES ABOUT TANDEM BICYCLES, By Ron Burzese
</a></font color></b></center></h1>

<center><img alt="2 IMAGES OF WHOZITS STANDING NEXT TO TANDEM BIKES" height="200" width="212.5" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/tandem_whozit.PNG" />
<img height="200" width="212.5" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/tandem_whozit.PNG" /></center>

<font color="white">
<p />Ever since I was a little guy, my recreational activity of choice has always been riding my bike. I have been on 2 wheels since the age of 7. I have been riding more serious, road bikes on 60-mile club rides since the age of 13. For years, I took real chances, riding my single bike with limited eyesight. Thankfully, I am here to warn some of you against this practice. I was 26 when I attended the Louisiana Center for the Blind, where I came to grips with my ever apparent blindness, from Retinitis Pigmentosa. At the age of 29, I purchased my first tandem bicycle and truly returned to my life sport, only this time, without the guilt. I had always thought that I would lose much of why I loved the sport by riding on the back of a tandem. Once I tried it, however, I realized just how much I was missing by trying to fake it on a single bike.

<p />Cycling is one of the best forms of exercise out there. It is low impact, aerobic, and social. Depending on how you are riding, you can burn 400 to 1,000 calories per hour. It can actually be therapeutic for many medical problems and preventative for many others. Best of all, you can be meeting new friends or catching up with old ones as you ride. My favorite rides are when 20 or 30 miles go by and I do not even realize it. I am just having a great time with my friends, out in the fresh air. 

<p />Not only do I enjoy riding tandems, I like working on them. I also love introducing cycling to new riders. Here, I have put together some brief thoughts to hopefully entice you into trying out tandem cycling. I will include my contact information, if you need further assistance. Please feel free to contact me. 

<p />I categorized tandem bicycles into 3 basic levels: entry-level, sport/recreational, and advanced. My first tandem was an advanced model. I had already been a cyclist in the past and knew what to expect. That said, it took me over a year to write that check. Once I did, I wished I had done it 10 years earlier. 

<p />If you just want to ride around the neighborhood, you can purchase an entry level tandem. These usually cost around $600 to $800 brand new. You can possibly find them used on the web for 200 to $400. They are less expensive, because of mass production overseas, from relatively inexpensive materials. Because these materials are heavier, the tandem will not be as responsive, especially when riding up a hill. They also may not be as reliable as a more expensive tandem. However, if speed or efficiency is not the goal, then you may be happy with this level. Take note that these tandems are often referred to as cruiser or comfort tandems. They have 26 inch mountain bike style tires, higher handlebars, and bigger saddles, often with springs. The tires are wider and ride smoothly on the road, but offer greater stability on trails and rough pavement. The versatility is an advantage here. Because of a more upright riding posture and only one position for your hands, these bikes are only good for an average distance of 25 miles, or two hours of riding. You can squeeze a longer day out of them occasionally, if you are feeling fit. However, if you ride it more frequently, you may want to graduate to the next level. Raleigh, KHS, Crestline, and Univega are some examples of great, entry-level bikes. Wal-Mart may have a tandem for around $300, but I have no experience with it. If you want one, contact me and I will check one out to give you my opinions. If you are considering participation in triathlons, I'd skip this segment altogether.  

<p />The next level up is what I would call the middle class enduro and road tandem. New, these bikes cost about $1,000 to $2,500. They are made by Burley, Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Fuji, and other brands. Enduro means that you can use it on or off the pavement, depending on the chosen tires. You might be wondering what you get for the extra money? It is a good question to ask, and the answer is simple--a lighter frame and components. When I say lighter, I mean the average bike in this category is about 10 to 15 pounds lighter. You will notice a better ride and a more efficient transfer of power from your legs to the wheels. Simply put, a better experience of what cycling really can be. They may have wider, mountain tires, or skinnier, road style wheels, which are 700c, (metric for 27 inch). The skinnier tires are more specific to road riding, though they can handle some off-road paths with careful riding. These bikes are better equipped for actually riding a 25-60 mile ride. They will shift and brake better, run quieter, and invite you to ride more with a bike club. A road bike is marked by the ram-style handlebar. The object here is to not necessarily get you down lower, but offer more hand positions for comfort on longer rides. Let me say here that as your fitness improves, you may come to prefer riding in a less upright position. When you lean forward, you actually feel more stable and take more weight off the saddle as you ride. These bikes have faster tires that require more air pressure. A bike I like in this price range is the Raleigh Pursuit. At $1,350 to $1,500, it is a great value for a bike that I would even race. It is no longer made, but dealers may still have them in stock. 

<p />The third level of tandem bikes is worth mentioning here because you may come across them on the market, used, for the same price as the mid-priced bikes I just described. They generally cost $2,500 to $4,000 and higher. They are made by tandem specific companies like Co-Motion, Burley, Santana and include higher end Treks and Cannondales. These bikes have still lighter, aluminum frames with often faster wheels. A noteworthy bike in this segment is the Co-Motion PeriScope. If I had to do it over again, I might very well buy one of these. For a blind person, who may ride with pilots of a variety of statures, this bike offers you such versatility. For example, you can ride it with a 5'2" woman in the front for one ride, and then, the same bike can be ridden with a 6'3" man. I am just giving a rough guess here. I currently have two road tandems, one for tall riders and one for smaller ones. If I had a PeriScope, I could get by with one bike that can even be raced. This bike starts at $3,000, but if you are planning to grow into cycling, then consider it an investment in your health and social life. 

<p />A few general notes to consider when purchasing a tandem. Make sure the bike fits you well. This is more important for the captain, or pilot up front. The back seat of a tandem can fit a wider range of riders. Also, before you spend good money to upgrade the saddles, first, upgrade your rear end by riding the bike for more frequent, but shorter rides. Your body simply needs time to adjust to the new activity. Usually, the softer, more comfortable saddles become less comfortable as the ride progresses. This is because your sit bones sink into the soft saddle. This will put pressure on the surrounding soft tissue, which is not meant to bare your weight.  

<p />Also, you do not need an expensive tandem to attract pilots. If that were the case, I would not want to ride with such people. It may have been a passing joke, but I want to stop the myth before it becomes legend. If you are riding on the road with a group, you may want to get a road tandem to better deal with the distances and speeds. For a tandem, though, there is of course two people to help keep up with the single bikes, so focus on the motors, too.  

<p />Most modern tandems are 24 speed or higher. If you get a 21 speed, or a 30 speed, it will not matter. If you plan to ride a lot, I'd be careful about buying a tandem older than 1998. Some standards came into vogue around that time that may make upgrading easier.  

<p />A lesser priced tandem may be a great way to gain experience. As you grow as a rider, or a team, you can sell it and move up to the next level. Tandems usually hold their value pretty well. 

<p />For more reading, check out:

<ul>
<li> <a href="http://www.thetandemlink.com">The Tandem Link Info</a>
<li> <a href="http://www.precisiontandems.com">Precision Tandems</a>
<li> <a href="http://www.tandemmag.com">Tandem Magazine</a>
</ul>

<p />Any other questions, feel free to contact me at <a href="mailto:rockthebike@usfamily.net">my email address</a> or by phone at 512-419-1372.
<br /><br /><br />

<center><hr width="50%" /></center>

<p />Did you recently read a cool news article about a blind athlete? Do you have your own sports story to share? If so, write it down and <a href="mailto:lmartinez217@gmail.com">send it to us!</a> It might just end up in a future issue of the Competition Corner!  
</font color>
<br /><br /><br />
<hr />

<h1><center><b><font color="yellow">
<a name="a5">FETA-SPINACH SALMON ROST<br>  
Submitted By Lisamaria Martinez</a></font color></b></center></h1>

<font color="white">
<p />Editor's Note. I have tried this delectable dish and I love it! For those who distaste salmon, try the recipe with boneless skinless chicken breast. If they are thin, bake for approximately 30 minutes. If they are thicker chicken breasts, bake for approximately 40 minutes. Always check to be sure the meat is cooked. The chicken version is just as magalicious. 

<p />I found this tasty recipe one day from a book downloaded from Bookshare.org. The book is called, 500 Low-Carb Recipes: 500 Recipes from Snacks to Dessert that the Whole Family Will Love, by Dana Carpender. My husband and I love this delicious dish! Try it and you'll fall in love too. 

<p />INGREDIENTS
<ul>
<li>3 ounces cream cheese, softened 
<li>3/4 cup crumbled feta 
<li>1/2 cup spinach, chopped 
<li>1/4 cup green onion, if desired
<li>2 skinless salmon fillets, roughly same size and shape equaling 0.75 pounds
<li>Olive oil 
</ul>

<p />DIRECTIONS 
<ol>
<li>Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
<li>Combine the cream cheese and feta, mashing and stirring with a fork until well blended. Add green onions and spinach. Combine well. 
<li>Spread the mixture evenly over one salmon fillet. Top with second fillet. Brush both sides of the fillet with olive oil. 
<li>Place loaf on shallow baking pan and bake for 20 minutes.
</ol>

<p />Yield: 2 servings, each with 5 grams of carbs, a trace of fiber, and 45 grams of protein.
<br /><br /><br />
<hr />

<p />Donít forget to join the Sports and Recreation Division. For questions about joining please contact Lisamaria Martinez, president, for more details. You may also join our listserv by simply going to www.nfbnet.org and clicking on the link ďJoin or Drop NFBnet Mailing Lists.Ē

<p />Thanks for reading COMPETITION CORNER! 
</font color>

<center><img alt="IMAGE OF MULTIPLE WHOZITS STRIDING ACROSS THE PAGE" src="http://www.lisamaria.org/multiple_whozits.png" /></center>


</div></div>
</body bgcolor></html>