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joe harcz Comcast joeharcz at comcast.net
Mon Dec 6 09:49:44 CST 2010


MCB Insight
Michigan Commission for the Blind, November 2010

 

 

In This Issue:  (Click on title to go to the complete article.)

 

Reflections of the Past Eight Years and Hope for the Future
By Pat Cannon, MCB State Director

 

MCB Braille and Talking Book Library: New Name, Same Great Services

By Susan Turney, Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Lansing

 

A S E D Conference Focuses on Leveraging Disability Experience
By Susan Turney, Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Lansing

 

SEE Program Helps Students to See Into the Working World

By Danielle Smith, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Flint

 

Holiday Safety Tips

By Nichole Wright, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Lansing

 

Sherry Gordon Receives Award 

By Lisa Kisiel, Assistant West Region Manager, Kalamazoo

 

Great News About Passage of the COAT (Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology) Bill

By Christine Movalson, MCB Insight Editor, Lansing

 

Staff News

 

Staff Profile: James Hull

By Christine Movalson, MCB Insight Editor, Lansing

 

 

Reflections of the Past Eight Years and Hope for the Future
By Pat Cannon, MCB State Director

 

As Governor Jennifer M. Granholm heads into the last two months of her eight years of serving as Michigan’s Governor it seems fitting to reflect upon her impact on the Michigan Commission for the Blind, our clients, as well as people with disabilities generally.  As you may know, it has been my privilege to serve as her Disability Policy Advisor, as well as her State ADA Coordinator, so I’d like to offer my perspective on some of the advances we’ve achieved since 2002.

 

For starters, in my first meeting with her as our new Governor, January 2, 2003, I asked for two things on behalf of the Commission and our clients.  First, the transfer of MCB from the Family Independence Agency (FIA) to a department which better aligns with our mission and, secondly, to support an adjustment in the split of Title I funds under the Rehabilitation Act so blind persons in our state could receive a more equitable share of the federal pie.  Later that year, we were transferred from FIA to the newly created Department of Labor and Economic Growth and, thanks to the active involvement and support of the new Director of Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS), Jaye Shamsiddeen, we reached an agreement to increase MCB’s share from 12 percent to 15 percent, which put us on par with other blind rehab agencies throughout the country which receive, on average, 15 percent of allocated rehab funds.

 

Since then, under the Granholm Administration and the leadership in the Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth (DELEG), we have enjoyed strong support and involvement from individuals like former directors David Hollister, Bob Swanson, Keith Cooley, Skip Pruss and Andy Levin, deputy directors Dennis Sykes, Sharon Bommarito, Irma Zuckerberg and Liza Estlund-Olson.  Many, many others in DELEG have been so very supportive of us as well, including Al Pohl, Patty Gamin, Debbie Huntley, Sharon Lycos, LeAnn Droste and on and on.  While I will not attempt to include the names of everyone who has been so helpful to us, suffice to say, that we could not have enjoyed the successes we’ve had without the strong support, guidance and assistance of very many fine individuals in DELEG, not to mention, of course, all of the terrific staff of MCB and our Commissioners.

 

As many of you know, inclusion has been an integral part of the Granholm Administration.  The Governor has attempted to ensure representation for people with disabilities throughout state government and has made it a priority to consider people with disabilities as we advance public policy affecting the lives of all of our citizens.  Governor Granholm knows well that during these very difficult times, we cannot afford to waste the talent, ingenuity and resourcefulness of people with disabilities in Michigan.  The appointment of people with disabilities to various boards, commissions and job in state government, including the Governor’s Cabinet, is evidence of this commitment.

 

With the dedication and hard work of many, we have been able to make advances in several areas which benefit people with disabilities in Michigan and following are a few examples:

 

·        Implementation of the Freedom to Work Program has enabled many individuals with disabilities to go to work without fear of losing critical health care coverage.  Today, approximately 4,500 persons with disabilities are enrolled in this program, which has often been referred to as the Medicaid buy-in initiative, meaning they did not have to choose between the dignity of working and keeping health care coverage.

 

·        Our commitment to providing a range of long-term care options is making it increasingly possible to choose alternatives to institutional care, enabling many people with disabilities to receive care at home so they may remain in their home and community.  The Governor’s establishment of her Long Term Care Task Force, then upon its recommendation, the Long Term Care Commission, has significantly moved this important issue forward and, today, is providing a real choice to more and more individuals.

 

·        Five years ago, Governor Granholm and then-DLEG Director Hollister worked hard to support catering by Business Enterprise Program operators in state-owned facilities.  Director Hollister sent a letter to all department directors and made a subsequent presentation to the Governor’s Cabinet Council to promote BEP catering in state facilities.

 

·        Our state’s various websites and other communication technologies and tools have been developed with accessibility in mind, often modeling the Section 508 standards, to ensure that everyone can access the wealth of information we provide.  While we’re not yet perfect in this quest, we’ve made great progress thanks to the tenacity of people like Scott Norris, Sherri Heibeck, Susan Turney, Sue Luzenski and others.

 

·        We’ve used technology to increase access for people with disabilities so they may participate and interact in public meetings remotely and weigh in on policy development.  For example, Commission for the Blind meetings are routinely audio streamed so consumers may listen and participate by submitting comments via email.

 

·        We’ve also strengthened our resolve to ensure that all meeting sites are accessible and barrier-free to persons with disabilities.  While this was initially underscored in a letter from the Governor to all departments, it was subsequently made part of DTMB’s Administrative Guide to State Government under the Section on Accessibility, which also requires accessible alternative formats as needed.

 

·        Most video productions procured, produced or otherwise used by state government now include captioning and audio description.  This, too, was originally directed by the Governor and is now part of the Administrative Guide to State Government.

 

·        Through critical public/private partnerships we have significantly enhanced recreational opportunities for people with disabilities throughout the state.  Advances in this priority include accessible hiking trails, boat docks, fishing piers, parks and accessible play areas at some highway rest stops, part of the very successful collaborative “So that all may play” initiative.  These accessibility enhancements to recreational opportunities have truly captured the spirit of the ADA and its promise to provide the full integration of people with disabilities into all aspects of our society.

 

·        The Governor’s Equal Opportunity and Diversity Council is continuing its work to ensure that people with disabilities are well-represented in state government and that they are effectively accommodated.  Training on disability for managers is one of several products of this good work. Both Governor Granholm and the First Gentleman participated in disability training, Windmills, along with all Executive Office staff.

 

·        Department diversity plans also cover recruitment as a critical step to promoting more diversity in state government.  And, thanks to the leadership of Civil Service Director Jeremy Stevens, commitment to diversity will be part of the competencies assessed as part of the state performance appraisal system.

 

·        We continue to ensure that all the programs, services and activities of state government are readily accessible to, and usable by, people with disabilities.

 

·        There are several things that we have done and continue to do to promote the employment of people with disability, including our efforts to help the employer community understand the importance of focusing on the abilities of people with disabilities rather than the disabilities.  People with disabilities do not want a gift or a handout.  We don’t want to be given a job for which we are not qualified.  We simply want an opportunity to compete for jobs on the basis of our abilities and what we can do.  Further, our increased activities to promote entrepreneurship, job training and re-training definitely include people with disabilities.  We’re also using federal grants to help provide work experience and employment opportunities for people with disabilities, MCB’s Client Internship Program being just one example.

 

·        Governor Granholm has been present and visible in many, many settings and events for people with disabilities.  You’ll recall, for example, her participation in the Commission’s 25th Anniversary Celebration at the MCB Training Center, her attendance at several DELEG events, in meetings with all Department ADA Coordinators and at numerous bill-signing ceremonies and ribbon-cutting events.  In the past eight years she has been very approachable, very open and truly dedicated to the inclusion of people with disabilities in all that we do.

 

While it has been a privilege for me to be involved on the fringes of many of these achievements, it’s important to note that all of these and many other successes have been the result of the hard work and involvement of many, many talented and hard working individuals.  Further, it has been my observation through more than 30 years of working in the disability arena that advancements and victories that have been won on behalf of people with disabilities have almost always come with strong bi-partisan support.  The hard-fought enactment of the Michigan Persons with Disabilities Civil Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act and many other important disability laws are the result of strong, cooperative, bi-partisan collaborations.  So, with this background of achievements, we can look forward to future support and successes with the incoming administration of Governor-Elect Rick Snyder.

 

In the coming weeks and months, MCB and DELEG will be involved with the transition of the Snyder administration and I am confident that our cooperation and support for all of those involved in the new administration will help to pave the way for not only a smooth transition, but also lay the groundwork for more successes on behalf of the blind clients we strive to effectively serve.  I thank all of you – and each of you – for your continued dedication to help restore hope for blind persons in our state.

 

 

MCB Braille and Talking Book Library: New Name, Same Great Services
By Susan Turney, Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Lansing

 

The library formerly known as the Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped is now the Michigan Commission for the Blind (MCB) Braille and Talking Book Library.

 

“The new name was the most popular choice among library patrons and staff,” said Library Manager Sue Chinault.  “It’s also consistent with the popular practice of describing a library’s services rather than trying to describe the people served by that library.”  

 

The MCB Braille and Talking Book Library, located in Lansing, serves individuals throughout Michigan who are blind or visually impaired, who cannot physically hold a book and turn the pages, or who have a physically based reading disability.  The library is one of 57 regional libraries nationwide in the Library of Congress National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped network, lending Braille books, Talking Books, and audio playback equipment to patrons without charging any fees.  Books are available by digital download or by USPS Free Matter mailing, without shipping charges.  Patrons can call toll-free to consult with library reader advisors to request titles in the format best suited to their needs. 

 

The library name change took effect on October 1, 2010, the one-year anniversary of the library’s move from the Library of Michigan to the Michigan Commission for the Blind, when the former Michigan Department of History, Arts and Libraries was disbanded and its agencies reassigned to other state departments.  MCB was a natural choice as the library’s new home.  During the past year, library patrons, commission consumers, and staff participated in the selection of the library’s new name—the MCB Braille and Talking Book Library.

 

Historically, library service for the blind has been available nationwide since it was mandated by federal law in 1931.  Initially, the focus was on Braille books for adults who are blind.  Within a few years, Talking Books were developed on 78 rpm recorded discs.  Over the years, the law expanded to include people of all ages with vision loss and additional disabilities.  Talking Books have advanced from rigid disc to floppy disc, to 4-track cassette, to the new digital books with crystal-clear audio and easy-to-use player machines.  

 

For more information, please call toll-free (800) 992-9012 or visit www.michigan.gov/mcb and click on the link titled MCB Braille and Talking Book Library—Eligibility & Application.

 

 


Photo:  Pat Cannon stands at the podium during his presentation at the annual Alliance of State Employees with Disabilities conference, where participants listened to speakers and shared their thoughts on being workers with disabilities in state service.
 

 

A S E D Conference Focuses on Leveraging Disability Experience
By Susan Turney, Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Lansing

 

On October 28, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., the Alliance of State Employees with Disabilities (A S E D) held its annual conference, this year at Peckham headquarters in Lansing with 70 participants.  The 2010 conference was titled “Leverage:  Workers with Disabilities in State Service,” and  focused on three topics including 1) the business of careers, 2) an exploration of medical ethics, and 3) leveraging disability experience for individual career advancement.   The conference date coincided with the October celebration of Michigan State Employees with Disabilities Awareness Month, National Disability Employment Awareness Month, and Investing in Abilities Month in Michigan.  

 

MCB staff were an active part of the day’s agenda. Participants were welcomed to the conference by Scott Norris, A S E D President as well as librarian and reader advisor at the MCB Braille and Talking Book Library.  MCB State Director Pat Cannon participated in a panel discussion together with representatives from several other state agencies on the current state of employment of workers with disabilities in state service.  He also spoke as part of a group presentation on disability networks.

 

Other presenters included State Personnel Director Jeremy Stephens, Michigan Rehabilitation Services Deputy Director Lou Adams, Veterans Services Director Gen. Robert Smith, and Michigan Department of Community Health Disability & Health Coordinator Candace Lee, to name a few.  The keynote address was given by Dr. Alice Dreger, Professor of Clinical Medical Humanities and Bioethics at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University in Chicago, who spoke on “Medical Ethics & Social Policy.”  

 

For a complete list of all of the presenters and topics, see the detailed agenda online at http://michiganased.org/2010detailedagenda.htm.    

For more information on A S E D or to become a member, call (517) 775-8066 or send an email to scottjnorris at comcast.net.

 

 

SEE Program Helps Students to See Into the Working World
By Danielle Smith, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Flint

 

The Michigan Commission for the Blind (MCB), Genesee Intermediate School District (GISD) and The Disability Network (TDN) came together for the objective of widening the doors to the world of work for their transition and college students.  This collaboration created an exciting program known as the Summer Employment Excursion, referred to as SEE. The goal of SEE was to partner with local companies to provide opportunities for blind and low-vision participants to gain work experience, while meeting the work demands of the company. 

 

To prepare these students to take on the challenges of the workforce, the SEE students participated in job readiness training workshops provided by TDN. These training workshops covered a range of topics such as obtaining and maintaining a job, staying out of trouble on the job, managing their money, and empowerment. On the last day of the training workshops, TDN conducted “mock interviews” with actual employers from the community. The participants were asked to come dressed and prepared as though they were going to a real interview. The interviewers were available to answer questions the participants had in reference to having a successful interview. After the mock interviews were completed, evaluation sheets on the participants were completed to help them discover any areas that may deter an employer from hiring them and highlight individual strengths that the students may be able to continue to build upon.

 

The SEE participants were placed with employers throughout the Flint and surrounding areas. These sites included the Business Enterprise Program (BEP) Snack Shop located in the Flint State Office Building, Classy Raggz II (retail consignment shop), Berry’s Child Care Center, Low Incidence Outreach, Queen Ann’s Adult Foster Care Home, and the Michigan Commission for the Blind. The students were available and ready to work starting the first week in July, and were able to work for eight weeks through the last week in August, for up to 20 hours per week. Many of the participants this year had no previous work history, so this was their first opportunity to prove that they can be valuable members of the workforce.

 

Ms. Jowanne Carrigan, who is the owner of Classy Raggz II in downtown Flint, stated, “I feel the SEE program is a wonderful program. It helps these students to build confidence while gaining knowledge through the world of work, by teaching responsibility and how to overcome obstacles. Although one may have a disability, such as a visual impairment, they can still see only in a different way such as through compassion, empathy, strength and independence. Classy Raggz II will definitely be willing to participate in the future.”

 

SEE participants gathered in mid-July to discuss their various placements and Jules Brown, Career Specialist with MCB, spoke with the students on job readiness skills and provided another opportunity for students to gain a better understanding of the world of work. Students were awarded with certificates of completion at our final meeting on Thursday, August 26, 2010. 

 

The three collaborating agencies all believe in promoting self-advocacy and recognized there was a need for those with visual disabilities to have every opportunity to live as limitless as possible. Completing this Summer Employment Excursion was definitely one of several ways that the participants have been able to move closer to reaching their goal of greater independence.  Students, parents and all professional parties involved thought this was an awesome way for the participants to earn money while gaining knowledge and autonomy. So, overall the 2010 Summer Employment Excursion was a success. 

 

In closing, I would like to congratulate all students who participated this year.  They all did a wonderful job and say thank you to all the local employers who gave our students the opportunity to practice their work skills. We look forward to continuing this program for the 2011 summer. If you know of a student age 15-26  who is visually impaired and is looking to gain valuable work experience or know of an employer who may be interested in having a student work for their company next summer, please contact Danielle Smith at (810) 760-2036 or by email at smithd11 at michigan.gov.

 

 

Holiday Safety Tips
By Nichole Wright, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Lansing

 

It’s that time of the year when we get festive, spend more time with family and friends and enjoy lots of home cooking and yummy desserts. During this time of year it’s important to keep in mind safety tips that when followed will ensure a wonderful outcome for the holidays. For those of us that enjoy the delicious taste of fried turkey for Thanksgiving, listed just for you are tips to stay safe and have the best fried turkey ever. Hope these tips are helpful but keep in mind if you’re not sure about something contact the manufacturer of the turkey fryer purchased. “Enjoy Your Bird.”

 

·        Read and follow all instructions that come with your fryer (To the men: important word in this sentence is “Read” I know a lot of you don’t like to read instructions but hey, we want you guys around after the holidays, so please read).

·        Always use the fryer outdoors on a level surface away from buildings and material that can burn and never leave it unattended.

·        Please do not use on a wooden deck, wooden surface, or in the garage.

·        Make sure the turkey is thawed completely and lower it slowly into the hot oil.

·        Please keep children and pets away when preheating, during cooking, and hours after when the oil is cooling down.

·        The use of well-insulated potholders will prevent burns and safety goggles will protect eyes from popping oil.

·        Have an all-purpose fire extinguisher nearby and remember water and hot oil don’t mix.

 

 

The day after Thanksgiving is a very popular shopping day when some of us like to camp outside of Best Buy in our tents in hopes of getting that spectacular electronic item, LOL!!! Okay, on a serious note, please keep some basic personal safety tips in mind when shopping during the holidays: 

 

·        Stay alert and be aware of everything around you. Take a minute to observe who may be watching you. This is the time of year con artists get really creative.

·        Park in a highly visible well-lighted space. It may be daylight when you arrive at the mall etc. but dark when you come out.

·        Lock your vehicle both when parked and driving.

·        Carry purses close to your body and put wallets in front pockets.

·        Have car keys ready in your hand before leaving the store.

·        Place all shopping bags, packages, gifts etc. in the trunk.

·        Remember where you parked. Don’t walk around lost, this makes you vulnerable

·        Look under, around, and inside your car before entering.

·        Don’t park next to a van or truck where people can hide.

·        Avoid having large sums of money. Use a debit/credit card when possible.

·        Don’t overburden yourself with packages. This also makes you vulnerable.

 

Be safe and have fun this holiday year, please keep those less fortunate in mind and donate to food banks, Toys for Tots and other charitable agencies. A little goes a long way. 

 

 

Sherry Gordon Receives Award
By Lisa Kisiel, Assistant West Region Manager, Kalamzoo

 

Sherry Gordon was nominated posthumously by Shannon McVoy and Lisa Kisiel for an Excellence Award presented at the Michigan Rehabilitation Association (MRA) conference in Traverse City.  With the support of many people who wrote letters of appreciation, Sherry received this award.  Her parents were presented with the award on Wednesday, November third at the MRA Conference in Traverse City.  The award was given during lunch and the opening address.  It was wonderful that we had strong MCB support at the session.   We gave a big “Woo hoo” for Sherry’s parents as they accepted this honor.  It was an emotional event for many of us.  Thanks so much for continuing to honor Sherry (former Regional Manager in Kalamazoo) and keep her memory alive.

 

 

Great News About Passage of the COAT (Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology) Bill
By Christine Movalson, MCB Insight Editor, Lansing



On Tuesday, September 28, 2010, the "21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010" passed in the U.S. House of Representatives.  This was the last legislative obstacle for a bill that’s process began several years ago.  Passed by the House was the Senate bill, S. 3304, and S. 3828, a "technical amendments" bill that fixed some typos in the version the Senate had passed August 5th. As you may recollect, on July 26, the House had passed its version of the bill, H.R. 3101. Next stop is the White House when President Obama will sign the measure, putting it into law. After that, execution and enforcement processes start at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the federal agency with most responsibility.  The passage of the bill concludes a legislative process that has involved four hearings, six different bills, and education and awareness activities with various companies.  Advocates are thrilled that the legislative process is now over and we can look forward to the next stages of implementation. With over a dozen rulemakings expected from the FCC over the next several years, the requirements of the act will take time to have full effect.

 

 

Staff News
 

Gail Merwin is the new East Region Job Developer.  She began with MCB on September 7.  Gail comes to us from the Unemployment Insurance Agency (UIA).  She worked for UIA for a year and a half.  Gail can be reached at merwing at michigan.gov  or 313-456-1646.

 

Cathy Cove is a new administrative support person in Detroit.  Cathy comes to us from Michigan Rehabilitation Services and has been with the state since January of 2009.  She started with us on October 4. Cathy can be reached at covec at michigan.gov or 313-456-1646.  

 

Cherrele Alexander is MCB’s newest rehabilitation teacher.  She is located in the Lansing Regional office.  Cherrele can be reached at Alexanderc3 at michigan.gov  or 517- 373-6425.

 

Congratulations to Lisa Kisiel, MCB Rehabilitation Counselor in Kalamazoo, who has been promoted to Assistant Regional Manager for the West Region.

 

Laura Gonzales is the new temporary receptionist for the Lansing Central office.  Laura is filling in for Sally Postal.  Her email is gonzalesl1 at michigan.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Photo:  Christine and Simone sit side-by-side and smile for the camera.

 

MCB Insight newsletter editor (and client intern) Christine Movalson is now sharing office space with Simone, her new guide dog.  Simone, a female black lab, arrived in Lansing on September 21 with Christine after their three weeks of team training in California.  

 

Congratulations to Pam Crooks and family.  Your new boys Levi and Zander are handsome! Best wishes to you all!



Photo:  Left to right:  Levi and Zander smile for the camera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Staff Profile: James Hull
By Christine Movalson, MCB Insight Editor, Lansing



Photo: James Hull

Say “hello” to James Hull, acting Business Enterprise Program (B E P) Manager.  James has been with MCB for six years. He found out about employment opportunities with the commission when his Vocational Rehabilitation counselor told him about a job posting. Until his recent promotion, James was a B E P promotional agent.  He shares, “I miss spending as much time in the field as I used to, but I find many parts of being manager very rewarding.”  When asked what his favorite part of his job is, he explained, “I love giving operators good news, like when they get to start and where their location will be.  Giving people the opportunity to improve the quality of their lives makes up for the less fun stuff.” 

 

In contrast, the most difficult part of being B E P manager, James says, “Is doing what’s right when it is not popular, like having to take corrective action.”

 

A typical day for James includes working with promotional agents to help B E P operators.  James comments, “If we fix the five fires and half of what we expected to we’re satisfied.  We have a motto in B E P to expect the unexpected.”

 

James got his degree from Michigan State University in English Literature with a minor in Spanish.  He originally wanted to teach English as a Second Language, but changed direction after losing his sight the day after graduation.

 

It’s no surprise after learning that James was an English Lit. major, that one of his favorite spare time activities is reading.  He is currently reading a Lee Child novel.  Hunting, traveling, golfing, and wood-working round out his list of hobbies.  The project he is most proud of to date is a cedar-lined oak hope chest.

 

What he likes to do most is spend time with his family.  He is the youngest of four, including a twin brother.  They all live within five miles of each other and enjoy getting together for wining and dining.  In fact, he and his brother-in-law like to do the cooking!

 

James is known within his family to be a good listener and very honest.  If you ask him, he’ll tell you.  James describes, “I am horrible at keeping things to myself, my own secrets, not other people’s.”

 

If you have a question about the Business Enterprise Program or want to discuss hunting, golfing, or woodworking, he would be more than willing to give you an honest answer.  You can reach James at hullj at michigan.gov or 517-373-2064.

 

 
MCB Insight is a bimonthly e-mail newsletter published by the Michigan Commission for the Blind (MCB) and distributed to MCB staff during the first week of odd-numbered months.  If you have articles or ideas for MCB Insight, please send them to Christine Movalson at movalsonc at michigan.gov anytime.  Your suggestions and comments are welcome.  This publication is available in alternative formats upon request to persons with disabilities.

 

Contributors and others assisting with this issue: Cyndi Caldwell, Pat Cannon, Pam Crooks, Sue Chinault, James Hull, Lisa Kisiel, Scott Norris, Bob Robertson, Danielle Smith, Susan Turney, Beth White, and Nichole Wright.

 

Editor:  Christine Movalson, Communications & Outreach Intern, Michigan Commission for the Blind, DELEG.

 

Associate Editor:  Susan Turney, Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Michigan Commission for the Blind, DELEG.

 

Associate Editor:  Bob Robertson, Manager of Organizational Development, Michigan Commission for the Blind, DELEG.

 

The Michigan Commission for the Blind, a part of the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth, is an equal opportunity employer/program.  

 

Michigan Commission for the Blind

Michigan Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth

201 N. Washington Square, 2nd floor

 

 

 

 
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