[Ohio-Talk] From the Ohio Membership Committee "Braille Monitor June 2018"

Andra Stover astover at kent.edu
Sat Jun 29 13:34:36 UTC 2019


I love this. Thank you so much for sharing. I cannot wait until I attend my first NFB national convention!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2019, at 7:39 AM, Richard Payne via Ohio-Talk <ohio-talk at nfbnet.org> wrote:
> 
> Very encouraging.
> 
> 
> Richard Payne,  President
> National Federation of the Blind of Ohio
> 937-396-5573or 937/829/3368
> Rchpay7 at gmail.com
> The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the
> characteristic that defines you or your future. Every day we raise the
> expectations of blind people, because low expectations create obstacles
> between blind people and our dreams. You can live the life you want;
> blindness is not what holds you back
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ohio-Talk On Behalf Of Suzanne Turner via Ohio-Talk
> Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2019 8:25 PM
> To: NFBOH-Cleveland at nfbnet.org; 'Lisa Bostick' <lbostick04 at jcu.edu>;
> Victory71351 at AOL.COM; AlexisTyson2000 at Yahoo.com;
> wturner at clevelandsightcenter.org; 'Edgarsfarm' <edgarsfarm at aol.com>; 'Sandra
> Krems' <slkrems at yahoo.com>; Lelinda at roadrunner.com;
> Campbelllegal87 at gmail.com; bdowdy1983 at gmail.com; reggandjack at aol.com;
> bryantealysr at yahoo.com; shawgriff781 at gmail.com; Leeth123 at roadrunner.com;
> cantseecutie at att.net; Nricks123 at me.com; stuff12993 at aol.com;
> william.h.turner at ssa.gov; Williamsjoann at outlook.com; lmr.upshaw at gmail.com;
> remacd3 at gmail.com; 'NFB of Ohio Announcement and Discussion List'
> <Ohio-talk at nfbnet.org>; bdowdy1983 at gmail.com; MichaelSwinney05 at gmail.com;
> william.h.turner at ssa.gov; Williamsjoann at outlook.com; lmr.upshaw at gmail.com;
> 'kiana hill' <kiah976 at att.net>; Dr.Carolyn.Peters at gmail.com; 'Dave Bertsch'
> <dwbertsch at hotmail.com>; patrinkle at icloud.com; octaviaealy at hotmail.com;
> Price.Jeanetta at gmail.com; nicole.m.bell19 at outlook.com; 'Ali Benmerzouga'
> <ali.benmerzouga at hotmail.com>; jimweiss72 at icloud.com;
> Dorothea.Davis4444 at gmail.com; regina.mason216 at gmail.com;
> ccjeff at ameritech.net; Alex.French2.usaF at gmail.com; 'Albert Elia'
> <al4.elia at gmail.com>; Arringtonrs at gmail.com; lkaplan at ossb.oh.gov;
> NFBOH-Cleveland at nfbnet.org; 'Lisa Bostick' <lbostick04 at jcu.edu>;
> Victory71351 at AOL.COM; AlexisTyson2000 at Yahoo.com;
> wturner at clevelandsightcenter.org; 'Edgarsfarm' <edgarsfarm at aol.com>; 'Sandra
> Krems' <slkrems at yahoo.com>; Lelinda at roadrunner.com;
> Campbelllegal87 at gmail.com; bdowdy1983 at gmail.com; bryantealysr at yahoo.com;
> shawgriff781 at gmail.com; Leeth123 at roadrunner.com; cantseecutie at att.net;
> Nricks123 at me.com; stuff12993 at aol.com; william.h.turner at ssa.gov;
> Williamsjoann at outlook.com; lmr.upshaw at gmail.com; remacd3 at gmail.com;
> bdowdy1983 at gmail.com; MichaelSwinney05 at gmail.com; william.h.turner at ssa.gov;
> Williamsjoann at outlook.com; lmr.upshaw at gmail.com; 'kiana hill'
> <kiah976 at att.net>; Dr.Carolyn.Peters at gmail.com; 'Dave Bertsch'
> <dwbertsch at hotmail.com>; patrinkle at icloud.com; octaviaealy at hotmail.com;
> Price.Jeanetta at gmail.com; nicole.m.bell19 at outlook.com; 'Ali Benmerzouga'
> <ali.benmerzouga at hotmail.com>; jimweiss72 at icloud.com;
> Dorothea.Davis4444 at gmail.com; regina.mason216 at gmail.com;
> ccjeff at ameritech.net; Alex.French2.usaF at gmail.com; 'Albert Elia''
> <al4.elia at gmail.com>; Arringtonrs at gmail.com; lkaplan at ossb.oh.gov;
> BigPapaZo at roadrunner.com; WO.Turner5 at sbcglobal.net;
> brookecollins1987 at gmail.com; craybay3198 at gmail.com; danielle1089 at gmail.com;
> jvestal22590 at gmail.com; nicole.m.bell19 at outlook.com;
> jessicajones0199 at gmail.com; colwillre19 at lakecatholicapps.org;
> colwillre19 at lakecatholicapps.org; jjstover at kent.edu;
> jessicajones0199 at gmail.com; padaemma1 at gmail.com; mmolchan908 at gmail.com;
> Lcassi at kent.edu; Kinshuk.tella at gmail.com; BigPapaZo at roadrunner.com;
> R.Lutner at csuohio.edu; Disability at case.edu; remacd3 at gmail.com;
> Jessica.Baldwin at ClevelandMetroSchools.org; Kestranekm at parmaCitySchools.org;
> L.Casalina at csuohio.edu; Disability at case.edu; SAS at Kent.edu;
> Studentdisabilitysvs at utoledo.edu; Access at UAkron.edu; Mitchell.Jones at uc.edu;
> Access at bgsu.edu; SAS at JCU.EDU; CDixon at cpl.org; SDs34 at case.edu; 'Jesse Cooper
> Hall'' <jessecooperhall at gmail.com>; gnakita at gmail.com; tizzlejt at gmail.com
> Cc: Suzanne Turner <smturner.234 at gmail.com>
> Subject: [Ohio-Talk] From the Ohio Membership Committee "Braille Monitor
> June 2018"
> 
> New Members, Students and Potential Members,
> 
> 
> 
> If you are not joining us at the 2019 National Convention in Vegas. I have
> news for you! 
> 
> 
> 
> Come and go with us!
> 
> 
> 
> Where!
> 
> 
> 
> To 175 Hutchinson Avenue, Columbus Ohio! This is the DoubleTree by Hilton,
> Columbus/Worthington Hotel.
> 
> 
> 
> Why?
> 
> 
> 
> Because, this is where the happenings will be!
> 
> 
> 
> How?
> 
> 
> 
> Several ways! So, let me tell you!
> 
> 
> 
> First, Cleveland will have a chartered bus,  that will leave on November 1,
> 2019 and then return on November 3, 2019, headed to Columbus Ohio for the
> State of Ohio Convention and back.
> 
> 
> 
> What about the rest of the State?
> 
> 
> 
> Glad you've asked!
> 
> 
> 
> We have chapters in Cincinnati, Lorain, Columbus, Dayton, Springfield,
> Akron, and an At-Large Chapter; that will make every effort to get you to
> the most happening place in the State. 
> 
> 
> 
> So that you understand just what it means to be at a Convention. Read the
> article below. Although, the Author was at the National Convention. It also
> is relevant to our State Convention as well!
> 
> 
> 
> If you are on the fense. This article will make you pick up the telephone
> and call to make your reservation for the National Federation of the Blind
> of Ohio, 2019 State Convention!
> 
> 
> 
> So that you have the info, call (614) 885-3334 and reserve your room for
> November 1st through November 3rd 2019.
> 
> 
> 
> The Ohio Membership Committee will meet you there!
> 
> 
> 
> Don't forget to read the article below!
> 
> 
> 
> Carolyn Peters, Co-Chair
> 
> 
> 
> Suzanne Turner, Co-Chair
> 
> 
> 
> ///
> 
> Braille Monitor                                    June 2018
> 
> (back
> <https://www.nfb.org/sites/www.nfb.org/files/images/nfb/publications/bm/bm18
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> <https://www.nfb.org/sites/www.nfb.org/files/images/nfb/publications/bm/bm18
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> /bm1806/bm180612.htm> )
> 
> 
> Living the Movement: Ferret Federationists
> 
> 
> by Priscilla McKinley
> 
> From the Editor: This article first appeared in the March 2000 issue of the
> Braille Monitor. We are reprinting it here because it clearly illuminates
> the power of one person to change her perspective on life and the importance
> to those of us who are Federationists to live an example that makes this
> positive change seem possible and infinitely worthwhile. Here is how it was
> introduced when it first appeared eighteen years ago:
> 
> 
> 
> At this year's Mid-Winter Conference of the National Association of Blind
> Students, two students were invited to speak about their notions of what it
> means to live the movement. The first to address the audience was Priscilla
> McKinley, President of the Old Capitol Chapter of the NFB of Iowa, a member
> of the affiliate's board of directors, and a graduate student at the
> University of Iowa. Priscilla has also twice won NFB scholarships. This is
> what she said:
> 
> Good morning, Federationists, or perhaps I should say, "ferret-like
> Federationists." Yes, you heard me right: ferret-like Federationists. The
> other day, while sitting in my office thinking about my life as a blind
> person, I was continually reminded that my ferret was in the room asleep in
> her hammock hanging from the ceiling of her cage-the sound of her breathing
> very soft but noticeable. And then I thought of it, the perfect metaphor for
> this speech, my pet ferret Chloe.
> 
> A few months ago I had a dream in which I had a mink, a ferret, a mongoose,
> and a goat. When I woke the next day and asked my husband Brian if I could
> get one of those, he rejected the mink, mongoose, and goat, but finally
> agreed on the ferret. Two days later I had a pet ferret, and my obsession
> began.
> 
> Do any of you in this room have a ferret? Well I can tell you a few things
> about them. Ferrets are adorable little animals with long bodies that seem
> to change form with each movement. They have triangular heads with pointy
> little noses. They're related to weasels, badgers, otters, minks, and even
> skunks. But unlike those animals, ferrets have been domesticated for
> centuries because they were originally used to ferret out rabbits for
> hunters in England and later rats on farms in this country.
> 
> Spending most of their time in dark tunnels, most ferrets have very poor
> eyesight. They don't see well in the bright light, and they don't see color
> at all. Many are totally blind. Yet according to my ferret book, blind
> ferrets get around better than their sighted counterparts. Studies show that
> the blind ferrets use their other senses and are actually more aware of
> their surroundings. In fact, with their keen sense of direction, ferrets
> have often been used to wire planes and other equipment.
> 
> So what does this have to do with my life as a blind person, with your lives
> as blind people? Well, since spending about ten hours a day with Chloe,
> whose cage is in my office, I know that ferrets have two modes of operating:
> lethargic and lively, off and on. First there is mode one, in which the
> ferret sleeps between fourteen and sixteen hours a day, often climbing out
> of her hammock only to get a drink or piece of food. Sometimes too lazy to
> get out of her hammock, she will hang over the edge, stretching her long
> body to snatch up a raisin or a fruit treat.
> 
> When I lost my sight due to complications of diabetes, I was much like a
> ferret in the off-mode, extremely passive. I was content in my situation,
> letting others take care of me, letting others determine my fate. At first,
> suffering from depression, I wanted to sleep sixteen to eighteen hours a
> day. When my mother compared my blindness to the deaths of my sister and
> father, I thought she was right. I believed that my blindness was a tragedy,
> a death. When I decided to go back to school, my rehab counselor told me
> that maybe I could get a job at Goodwill-a good job in the office, not a job
> sorting clothes. I actually considered this for a while, but then I told my
> rehab counselor that instead I wanted to go back to school.
> 
> When I thought classes like science and foreign language might be too hard
> for me, a blind person, I requested waivers for those classes. When I was
> accepted into grad school and decided to apply for a job as a graduate
> instructor, one professor told me that perhaps I should teach a
> correspondence course, where I wouldn't have to deal with students. Another
> professor told me that I should apply for a job in the writing lab, where I
> wouldn't have to worry about an entire class, but would be working
> one-on-one.
> 
> When I registered for a practicum in that writing lab and asked the
> instructor when we'd be working with our students, she said, "We won't have
> to worry about students. I don't know how they would react to having a blind
> teacher." So, what did I do? I went home and cried. I snuggled up under my
> blankets on my bed, just as my little ferret snuggles up under her blankets
> in her hammock.
> 
> Even though I eventually had my own writing lab students and secured a
> position as a graduate instructor, I lacked self-confidence and a positive
> attitude about blindness. I remained in mode one-the off-mode. Then in 1996
> I attended my first convention of the National Federation of the Blind in
> Anaheim, California. For the first time in my life as a blind person I
> wasn't the minority, and I started scratching at the door of my cage,
> anxious to move into mode two-the on-mode. Just as my little ferret does the
> weasel joy dance, hopping and skipping and jumping, moving independently
> across my office floor, I observed Barbara Pierce, one of my mentors, flying
> across the floors of the Hilton, hurrying to get to her public relations
> meetings. Just as my little ferret extends her pointy nose to ferret out
> every nook and cranny of my house, I observed Peggy Elliott extending her
> seven- or eight-foot-long cane, eager to explore uncharted territory.
> 
> Just as my little ferret takes on my two sighted spaniels, chasing them
> through the house, often tugging on their tails, I observed Dr. Jernigan,
> Dr. Maurer, and the other leaders in the NFB taking on the big dogs in the
> world, not at all intimidated by their size.
> 
> When I returned home after the convention, I knew that I could never go back
> to my cage. I had tasted the freedom and the positive attitude about
> blindness the NFB offers blind individuals. Unlike ferrets, which spend
> their lives in those two modes, we as blind people can choose the mode in
> which we want to live our lives. We can choose to live in mode one, content
> to be locked in our cages, letting others determine what we can and cannot
> do. Or with the love and support of the National Federation of the Blind, we
> can live our lives in mode two, taking on the big dogs, exploring new
> ground, doing the weasel joy dance for all of the world to see.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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