[nabs-l] update on dog training career. need help!

Arielle Silverman nabs.president at gmail.com
Sun Aug 15 16:33:42 UTC 2010


Hi Val and all,

I think it's pretty crazy that some of the worst discrimination we
face is from fields dedicated to improving the lives of blind people,
such as O&M teaching and guide dog training. The underlying attitude
is that blind people should be recipients of specialized services, but
cannot be the service providers. I think this battle is even more
important to fight because it is unacceptable in my mind that people
who train guide dogs for the blind feel the need to discriminate
against blind trainers. For that matter, how does this school expect
its blind students to defend themselves in situations where their dog
may be attacked by another animal that is "aggressive and
confrontational"?

Arielle

On 8/14/10, Beth <thebluesisloose at gmail.com> wrote:
> Val,
> I really love your attitude.  I'm not going to make people like me for
> what I want to do for women, so I'm just going to go to school and
> becomea social worker for women in battered women's shelters.  So what
> if people say I can't stqand a cowering woman and a big violent guy?
> I'm tiny, really tiny, and I think short people have pretty big
> brains, mind you.  This goes to show that it's all about one's
> attitude.
> Beth
>
> On 8/14/10, Valerie Gibson <valandkayla at gmail.com> wrote:
>> I also do not agree with cuting my losses to this school, simply bcause of
>> the aftermath, for a couple of reasons.
>>
>> 1.  I've looked into other dog training schools, and this one seems to be
>> the best. it offers hands-on training over a lot of subjects related to
>> dog
>> training as well as dog care such as neutrition, health problems in
>> breeds,
>> etc.
>>
>> 2.  If i asked a sighted person to find a carreer that they liked, then
>> find
>> a school that would help them achieve that job, then told them, "now take
>> that school, and forget about it. find the second best.", they would most
>> likely tell me to take a long walk off of a short peer.
>>
>> Sighted people have professors that may not like them in universities, and
>> that does not mean that they should switch classes.
>>
>> Even after my schooling, i'm going to be faced with people who do not
>> approve of my job vhoice, and even more who will not allow me to train
>> their
>> dogs due to blindness. I might as well get used to it.
>>
>> I am going into the school to gain the knowledge and foundation that i
>> need
>> to become a successful dog trainer, and i'm not asking anyone to like me
>> for
>> it.
>> On Aug 14, 2010, at 8:49 PM, Joe Orozco wrote:
>>
>>> Mark,
>>>
>>> I don't know that I completely agree with finding another school that
>>> might
>>> be more welcoming and allowing actions to speak for themselves.  It's a
>>> good
>>> thought if only because it will move along Valerie's career, but not
>>> fighting it simply because a victory might expose her to an awkward
>>> environment afterward is not good enough to let it go.  A few years ago I
>>> sued a Chinese bus carrier after they gave me a hard time about my guide
>>> dog
>>> on what became three consecutive occasions.  On the first two occasions
>>> the
>>> situation became a nuisance involving the police.  I fought it and
>>> successfully took my trips to and from New York from DC, but the
>>> traveling
>>> consisted of a lot of dirty looks and hateful muttering.  On the third
>>> attempt I was not even allowed to board the bus, but by then the case was
>>> already well on its way to federal court.  My point is that the current
>>> school will not learn from Valerie going away.  Finding another school
>>> while
>>> still pursuing action with the current campus is one option, but I hope
>>> something will become of this situation.  I do not know Valerie
>>> personally.
>>> I assume she meets all the other qualifications associated with
>>> enrollment
>>> and that the only reason enrollment is being denied is that she cannot
>>> see.
>>> If so, it's an issue that needs to be rectified if for no other reason
>>> than
>>> that the opportunity needs to exist for future blind applicants.  I don't
>>> know if my friendly little bus people would allow people to board their
>>> buses with service animals these days, but I know they'll at least think
>>> twice before saying "no."
>>>
>>> Best,
>>>
>>> Joe
>>>
>>> "Hard work spotlights the character of people: some turn up their
>>> sleeves,
>>> some turn up their noses, and some don't turn up at all."--Sam Ewing
>>>
>>>
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>>
>>
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-- 
Arielle Silverman
President, National Association of Blind Students
Phone:  602-502-2255
Email:
nabs.president at gmail.com
Website:
www.nabslink.org




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