[nabs-l] what do you do if you get lost

Arielle Silverman arielle71 at gmail.com
Tue Nov 15 02:39:01 UTC 2011


I agree, the cops are for true emergencies only. You don't want to
spend their time when you have other options available.
I think it's important to remember that being lost is just a temporary
condition. Being lost in itself is not dangerous, though it can be
scary and frustrating.
I don't think I've ever gotten severely lost in a residential area,
but if I did, I think my first strategy would be to listen for any
busy traffic. If I couldn't find busy traffic, I would keep walking in
one direction until I either heard busy traffic, or found a pedestrian
or someone getting out of a car.
I have often asked pedestrians for information, or gone into
businesses to ask for information. I don't like to wave down cars
unless I am very desperate because I don't want to block traffic.
I agree, it is best to ask for orientation clues first and only
request specific directions if the orientation clues don't get you
back on track. Sighted people are usually pretty good at reading signs
or pointing out landmarks in their field of vision; they can be
hit-or-miss when giving directions. I am told that many people get
their right and left confused even when following directions
themselves and these people often have a very hard time giving another
person turn-by-turn directions. Some people are so eager to help that
they fail to admit they don't know the area well.
Arielle

On 11/13/11, Ashley Bramlett <bookwormahb at earthlink.net> wrote:
> Hi,
> I wanted to respond now that I have a few more minutes.
> As I said, usually I try and ask other pedestrians at first. But if I'm
> confused and stop to think, they will usually approach me first. If not, I
> pick someone out and ask them. I have some vision and try and ask someone
> who looks nice; I feel that if they're dressed well, they're probably not on
> drugs or homeless.  So if they have a briefcase or dressed for work, that is
> good. Or in DC or a town, tourists are approachable, but likely do not know
> the answer to your question because they are not from the area.
>
> So I choose D or E if I'm in an area with people to ask.
> d: go in to a business and ask someone where you are, or just simply try and
> ask someone on the street for directions
> e: try to get your bearings together and find your own way.
>
> These two options sound the best. I was taught to ask questions from my
> mobility instructors.
> As one of them said, "your'e not in a forest. There are people around. So,
> don't be afraid to speak up."
> I've met many blind people with many different mobility instructors. None of
> them suggested calling the cops!
> I really hope that idea is not used much because the last thing we need is
> cops involved rescuing blind people.
> I notice that people ask where you're going. Personally, I do not want to
> reveal that. So I ask questions to re-establish orientation. For instance,
> what building is over there and point to the right. Or say, What is the next
> street? What is the next intersection? or What address am I near?
>
> Since I usually cannot read signs, having someone tell me what is around
> helps me get reoriented.
>
>
> But, I wonder something.
> What if you're  traveling in an area with few pedestrians, such as a
> neighborhood? What would you do then?
> I suppose you could ask someone if they are pulling into their driveway, but
> waiting for that could be a while.
> I think its wise to have a cell phone with you when your out so you can call
> for information or help. Like in my area, you can call a number to see when
> the next bus will arrive. We cannot read signs and the bus schedules, so I
> find this service helpful.
> You could also call other people you know for directions, or to pick you up
> if really needed. But, I'd say do not get the cops involved unless you feel
> lost, you are in an unsafe place, and/or people are doing things to you that
> make you feel unsafe.
>
> Ashley
> -----Original Message-----
> From: frandi.galindo at gmail.com
> Sent: Sunday, November 13, 2011 10:44 AM
> To: NFB
> Subject: [nabs-l] what do you do if you get lost
>
> Ok, bare with me here for a moment, and excuse my language.
> When you get lost do you
> a: call the cops and ask them where you are, and waste money in the process?
> b: wave down a cop when you don’t know if one is near you?
> c: wave your hands around and make other blind people look like jak asses in
> the eyes of an already general populous who think blind people are incapable
> of doing anything for themselves?
> d: go in to a business and ask someone where you are, or just simply try and
> ask someone on the street for directions
> e: try to get your bearings together and find your own way.
> I ask this because I know of someone who was tought to do what a, b, and c
> say to do.  I was tought by two outstanding mobility instructors to do what
> d says, and tought myself e.  I want to know what you all out their think.
> I personally think that making blind people look like helpless jack asses
> and wasting money on unesesary calls is pointless.  I’m almost sure most
> mobility instructors would teach their students to do what choice d asks.
> _______________________________________________
> nabs-l mailing list
> nabs-l at nfbnet.org
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/nabs-l_nfbnet.org
> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for
> nabs-l:
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/options/nabs-l_nfbnet.org/bookwormahb%40earthlink.net
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> nabs-l mailing list
> nabs-l at nfbnet.org
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/nabs-l_nfbnet.org
> To unsubscribe, change your list options or get your account info for
> nabs-l:
> http://nfbnet.org/mailman/options/nabs-l_nfbnet.org/arielle71%40gmail.com
>




More information about the nabs-l mailing list