[nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with tree

Robert Spangler spangler.robert at gmail.com
Mon Aug 16 21:04:11 UTC 2010


The problem with this view is that we as blind people are labeled as
walking lawsuits.  My ability to get a job has been severely limited
by such laws as the ADA which, FORCE, companies to comply.  who would
want to hire someone who has a larger chance of potentially sueing
them?  I sure wouldn't.  I would wish to hire the person who is going
to cost my business less and will allow me to operate much more
efficiently.  that being said, I am able to walk into any business
with all of the equipment that I will need to conduct the job without
asking the company to buy it for me.  the utilization of force never
works; it will cause companies to look for ways around hiring us.

On 8/15/10, Jedi <loneblindjedi at samobile.net> wrote:
> I'm not Ashley, but I can tell you what echolation is.
>
> Just like light, sound bounces off of, or is absorbed by, objects and
> then bounces back into our ears. Echolocation takes advantage of this
> in the same way sight does. The main difference is that, for the most
> part, there is an outside light source apart from the seer. In this
> case, the listener generally produces the sound that will bounce off of
> objects. Cane taps are usually sufficient. The quality of the sound
> tells the listener if it has been absorbed or bounced back and to what
> extent. Those who get good at it can even tell the shapes of the
> objects they listen to, where they are exactly located, and how far
> away they are. A listener can also gain this kind of information by
> using outside sound sources and listening to how those sounds bounce
> off of the objects they're close to.
>
> The average echolocation user can generally tell where trees and bushes
> are, people, large buildings, glass windows and doors, metalic objects
> like cars, curbs, and other very noticeable things like that. Some of
> us can tell smaller objects such as street poles, planters, and other
> things of the sort. Echolocation takes practice. I had to study it in
> Louisiana (I studied under Roland Allen, who is quite adept at
> echolocation). I would love to study under Dan Kish, the king of
> echolocation, however.
>
> Respectfully,
> Jedi
>
> Original message:
>> Hello Ashley,
>> What is echolocation?
>> Thanks,
>> Dennis
>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Ashley Bramlett" <bookwormahb at earthlink.net>
>> To: "National Association of Blind Students mailing list"
>> <nabs-l at nfbnet.org>
>> Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2010 3:13 PM
>> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with tree
>
>
>>> Hi Anmol and all,
>>> No don't place your hand in front at all times, but yes I think its
>>> reasonable to place an arm up or something to protect you when you are
>>> coming to an obstacle like a branch.  You can perceive this through
>>> echolocation or if its familiar you remember the overhanging obstacle.
>
>>> Ashley
>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>> From: "Anmol Bhatia" <anmolpbhatia at yahoo.com>
>>> To: "National Association of Blind Students mailing list"
>>> <nabs-l at nfbnet.org>
>>> Sent: Saturday, August 14, 2010 5:29 PM
>>> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with
>>> tree
>
>
>>>> Good points Sean!
>>>> To who ever said to keep your hand in frunt to prevent the branch from
>>>> hitting you, we do not when a tree is in frunt and the branches are
>>>> hanging out so does this mean we should walk around with our hand in
>>>> frunt at all times?
>>>> Anmol
>
>
>>>> --- On Sat, 8/14/10, Sean Whalen <smwhalenpsp at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>>>> From: Sean Whalen <smwhalenpsp at gmail.com>
>>>>> Subject: Re: [nabs-l] Blind man sues Wienerschnitzel over run-in with
>>>>> tree
>>>>> To: nabs-l at nfbnet.org
>>>>> Date: Saturday, August 14, 2010, 4:22 PM
>>>>> Thank you Dennis!
>
>>>>> You said everything I wanted to say, and then some.
>
>>>>> If the man was injured and incurred costs from the injury,
>>>>> he has a case. A
>>>>> sighted person could sue in the circumstances described
>>>>> where the branch is
>>>>> not illuminated at night. The limb causing injury is
>>>>> foreseeable, and
>>>>> somebody was negligent.
>
>>>>> A few other thoughts brought up by the discussion so far:
>
>>>>> The idea that I should always have my hand in front of my
>>>>> face is
>>>>> ridiculous. If it works for you, I'm not knocking it, but
>>>>> it certainly isn't
>>>>> a requirement of safe travel.
>
>>>>> Walking at a somewhat reduced pace in unfamiliar areas
>>>>> seems reasonable. I
>>>>> do it, and I don't think that exercising some caution
>>>>> indicates that I have
>>>>> subpar travel skills. Once you are familiar with an area,
>>>>> it is certainly
>>>>> easier to navigate it more quickly.
>
>>>>> Kirt is right in that this maybe shouldn't be news, but
>>>>> neither should a
>>>>> blind person graduating from a university, and I see that
>>>>> kind of thing
>>>>> written up frequently. Blindness is different, and makes a
>>>>> story more
>>>>> interesting to the general public. Not saying I like it,
>>>>> just saying it's
>>>>> so.
>
>
>
>
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>
>
>
>
>
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>
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-- 
Robert Spangler
The University of Toledo
Student Senator - Administrative Affairs Committee Chair, College of
Arts and Sciences




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